THE TRIUMPH OF SCIENCE AND REASON by Frederick L. Nussbaum

THE TRIUMPH OF SCIENCE AND REASON

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The most recent book in ""The Rise of Modern Europe"" series encompasses the years from 1660 to 1685. The author, Professor of History at the University of Wyoming, moves through the complex occurrences of these years with the conciseness, scope, and clarity that mark the expert. As William Langer points out in the introduction, his study rather than being centered on Louis XIV and his contemporaries is based on the achievements in science and art, development of political theory and organization, broadening and deepening of religious life, and the evolution of capitalistic economy. He feels the history of this period was based on the birth of Cartesianism, a way of thought which has not yet spent its spark, and considers the wars of the late seventeenth century anachronistic in face of ""the triumph of science and reason"". This is an exciting contribution to the series that can well stand alone, a book which is tightly written and which is based on a frankly stated interpretation that may arouse comment but will also command respect.

Pub Date: May 13th, 1953
Publisher: Harper