CAROL FROM THE COUNTRY by Frieda Friedman

CAROL FROM THE COUNTRY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The author of Sun with Judy and for Short again uses a city background- this time as a catalyst in the social adjustment of a lonely youngster from the country. Eleven-year-old Carol Clark, uprooted with her parents and the eight-year-old twins, from a quiet, happy life in the country where she was secure in the possession of a house, a friend and compliments on her paintings, is miserable when the family is forced into the midst of noisy, crowded New York City. Angrily Carol fights off the attempts of her neighbors to make friends -- no pretty quiet girls or well-mannered boys. And Betsy, who was pretty and quiet, thought she was a Snob! It is not the prize for a painting in the library contest which brings her popularity as she supposed, but a spontaneous act of kindness which finally opens the gates of social acceptance to Carol. Again as in the other books, the city children are the prototypes of a sociologist's dream- socially conscious, eager to group and unreservedly cordial to strangers. However, in spite of this artificial touch, the background is real and appealing, and Carol's change of heart can be easily accepted.

Pub Date: Sept. 6th, 1950
Publisher: Morrow