THE LAND THAT SLEEPS by G. M. Glaskis

THE LAND THAT SLEEPS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Assorted adventures in one of the few unknown worlds left, the North of Australia, told by an intrepid explorer, make for a suspenseful, slightly jaunty, very informative . What the Dark Continent once meant to the white man romanticist, so author Glaskin's own Under territory shall be in the future. Or so it would seem is the hope of this book, that asks Westerners to invest, populate and civilize a great unbridled, untapped reservoir and thus balance the coming racist rivalries of Asia. Questions of political geography aside, ""The Land That Sleeps"" fills in its primitive terrain with spectacular falls, gorges, kangaroos, jackaroos, alligators, shanty towns, bushfires, snake pits, a stupendous monolith called Ayers Rock, lots of little human or homey touches, a smattering of Old Empire emotions, and almost one damned mishap after another. Glaskin made the journey by car with a Malayan friend; they saw marvels of nature and unsurpassed beauty, mixed with friendly and unfriendly tribes, suffered tremendous discomforts, but came out of it all impressed, enlightened and excited. Chances are so will all travelogue lovers. It's unfortunate the writing lacks real perception and picturesque effectiveness, but the material is important and welcome, if only because very little else in that field is available. A sound buy for libraries.

Publisher: Doubleday