THE POTTERY PLACE by Gail Gibbons

THE POTTERY PLACE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Cheerful, detailed line drawings washed with watercolor illustrate what goes on in a potter's workshop. Making fired stoneware is time-consuming and difficult; Gibbons has not eliminated any steps, yet she makes the process interesting to young readers. A young friend (sexless, like the angels--a frizz of yellow hair, red shirt and jeans) comes to watch, following the potter through mixing clay and wedging; sharing tea while she gives a brief history of pot-making; and throwing (in detail), bisquing, glazing, firing and delivering. This potter is happily successful: her pots are ""wonderful"" and ""beautiful."" The last page gives a brief idea of ""How to make your own pottery,"" including pinch pots, coil pots and slab pots. This should lead to greater appreciation of an ancient and honorable art, as well as inspiring young potters. Best, it shows a craftsperson involved in a productive, pleasant, and technically challenging life-style, surrounded by flowers, geese and a picket fence.

Pub Date: Oct. 10th, 1987
Page count: 32pp
Publisher: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich