NEW DISCOVERIES IN OCEANOGRAPHY by Gardner Soule

NEW DISCOVERIES IN OCEANOGRAPHY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Why do men listen to whale talk?"". . . . ""Why do men map the bottom of the sea?"" Soule never answers his own questions and as he proceeds through short, choppy chapters that jump from the highest undersea mountain. . .to the deepest spot yet sounded. . .to fossils in Antarctica . . .to ""Discoveries in Many Fields,"" he forgets even to ask them. The book comes more and more to resemble a hodgepodge of notes, left over perhaps from The Greatest Depths (KR 1970). Though less advanced than many existing juvenile titles on the various topics that Soule skims over, this is actually harder to follow (or at least to attend to), simply because of Soule's indifference to the implications or the relative significance of the discoveries and his failure to relate one paragraph to the next or to weed out irrelevant data, such as the ages of various, barely mentioned investigators. Thus instead of being the easiest book on the subject, this more likely shares the distinction of Trieste passenger Andreas Rechnitzer, quoted here as announcing, ""I have sunk to lower levels than anyone else.

Pub Date: July 9th, 1974
Page count: 128pp
Publisher: Putnam