This well-thought-out collection includes many demonstrations familiar to science educators as well as some engaging new...

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GEOLOGY LAB FOR KIDS

52 PROJECTS TO EXPLORE ROCKS, GEMS, GEODES, CRYSTALS, FOSSILS, AND OTHER WONDERS OF THE EARTH'S SURFACE

From the Lab Series series

Explore the wonders of earth science through 52 activities.

A technical writer and longtime rock hound invites young readers to learn about geology through hands-on projects, many of which involve models that double as tasty treats. The introduction includes a spread of labeled rock samples. Opening with a simple activity to demonstrate crystal formation using supersaturated sugar water, author Romaine goes on to explore rock characteristics, molten rock (lava), sediments, metamorphosis, entropy, our active planet, fossils, precious metals, space rocks, and rocks in art. Each chapter begins with a spread of explanation opposite a full-page photograph of the natural phenomenon under discussion. Each lab includes a list of materials, step-by-step instructions, some safety tips and enrichment suggestions, and a boxed explanation of “the science behind the fun.” Each is illustrated with photos of the activity in progress, often including young experimenters (a diverse group of boys and girls) clearly enjoying their experience. The materials called for are simple and easily available. The time involved ranges from a few minutes to several days. Specialized vocabulary is defined in context. The author has spent many years doing geology with kids; his projects have obvious child-appeal.

This well-thought-out collection includes many demonstrations familiar to science educators as well as some engaging new ones and would be a welcome addition to any library. Dig in for fun and learning, too! (web resources, index) (Nonfiction. 8-14)

Pub Date: Oct. 1, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-63159-285-0

Page Count: 147

Publisher: Quarry

Review Posted Online: Aug. 21, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2017

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A splendid volume for young adventurers.

SURVIVOR KID

A PRACTICAL GUIDE TO WILDERNESS SURVIVAL

Based on her work with middle-school students, Long offers lessons on how to stay healthy and out of trouble while awaiting rescue, the same lessons taught to adults in her survival classes.

Her matter-of-fact, no-nonsense tone will play well with young readers, and the clear writing style is appropriate to the content. The engaging guide covers everything from building shelters to avoiding pigs and javelinas. With subjects like kissing bugs, scorpions, snow blindness and “How going to the bathroom can attract bears and mountain lions,” the volume invites browsing as much as studying. The information offered is sometimes obvious: “If you find yourself facing an alligator, get away from it”; sometime humorous: Raccoons will “fight with your dog, steal all your food, then climb up a tree and call you bad names in raccoon language”; and sometimes not comforting: “When alligators attack on land, they usually make one grab at you; if they miss, you are usually safe.” But when survival is at stake, the more information the better, especially when leavened with some wit. An excellent bibliography will lead young readers to a host of fascinating websites, and 150 clipart-style line drawings complement the text.

A splendid volume for young adventurers. (index not seen) (Nonfiction. 9-14)

Pub Date: May 1, 2011

ISBN: 978-1-56976-708-5

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Chicago Review Press

Review Posted Online: April 5, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 15, 2011

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What better way to make natural history slide down easily? (index) (Nonfiction. 8-10)

GET THE SCOOP ON ANIMAL SNOT, SPIT & SLIME!

FROM SNAKE VENOM TO FISH SLIME, 251 COOL FACTS ABOUT MUCUS, SALIVA & MORE

Cusick floats a slick, select gallery of nature’s spitters, nose-pickers, oozers, and slimers—most but not all nonhuman—atop nourishing globs of scientific information.

Title notwithstanding, the book is limited just to mucus and saliva. Following introductory looks at the major components of each, Cusick describes their often similar uses in nature—in swallowing or expelling foreign matter, fighting disease, predation and defense, camouflage, travel, communication (“Aren’t you glad humans use words to communicate?”), home construction, nutrition, and more. All of this is presented in easily digestible observations placed among, and often referring to, color photos of slime-covered goby fish, a giraffe with its tongue up its nose, various drooling animals, including a white infant, and like photogenic subjects. Two simple experiments cater to hands-on types, but any readers who take delight in sentences like “Some fungus beetles eat snail slime mucus” come away both stimulated and informed.

What better way to make natural history slide down easily? (index) (Nonfiction. 8-10)

Pub Date: Dec. 15, 2016

ISBN: 978-1-63322-115-4

Page Count: 80

Publisher: Moondance/Quarto

Review Posted Online: Sept. 19, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 2016

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