THE HEMLOCK AND THE CROSS by Geddes MacGregor

THE HEMLOCK AND THE CROSS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This is an absorbing study of the humanist tradition in its many forms and the bearing of that tradition upon contemporary Christian faith. Dr. MacGregor is especially interested in the Greek humanist tradition stemming from Socrates, for in this widespread faith that men maintained in the midst of their fading gods, the author sees a vast and divine preparation of the ancient world for the acceptance of Christian faith. When Paul came preaching God in Christ, there was already an audience which had been yearning for centuries for man at his best. The humanist upthrust and the divine downthrust in Christ formed a marriage so enduring that to this very day when man is devalued, the Christian faith is hurt, and when the Christian religion is attacked, it is man that loses meaning and purpose. This theme is so ably and comprehensively handled that anyone with even a college course in philosophy and an average layman's understanding of the Church could profit from an interesting book. Philosophy students will find it a quick review of their field. Preachers will mine the volume for its obvious sermons. Hopefully, some statesmen, editors and others who set the pattern for community thinking will also read it through. Both the urgency and the rationale of our Faith will become more clear.

Pub Date: Feb. 13th, 1963
Publisher: Lippincott