MARK OF THE HUNTER by Gene Caesar

MARK OF THE HUNTER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The rage to kill marks the postwar return of Marty Jevons with a dark strain of violence and, unable to face the civilized world, he lives alone in a lodge where his killer drive is stronger than any sporting instinct and is flanked by fear. His attraction to Goldy Carlson who works in the nearby town is only sensual and spasmodic, but a summer idyll with Pat Brodie brings a knowledge of a love which will be stronger than the restless, vicious excitement of stalking timber wolves. But Pat, who cannot escape the knowledge that his contempt for the world and retreat from it is only weakness, breaks with him once- and it is Marty who finds the courage alone to shoot his dog whom he has trained to kill and return with her.... There's not quite the distinction here of Hugh Fosburgh's The Hunter but the paycho-physical pattern of an obsessive instinctual drive has its moments of raw intensity.

Pub Date: Sept. 9th, 1953
Publisher: William Sloane