EN THE CHEERING STOPPED by Gene Smith
Kirkus Star

EN THE CHEERING STOPPED

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A skillful, and well documented, report on a unique, terrible and confused moment in history which centers on the death agonies of a dream of world peace and the man who dedicated his life to it- Woodrow Wilson. Broken by the loss of his wife Ellen, Wilson plunged grimly into the task of welding the world and he returned from Europe confident that the ideal for which he had sent American boys abroad, would move Americans to support the League of Nations to which he had already commited this country. During this time of rededication Mrs. Galt became his wife. With her at his side to reassure him, he set out on the grueling schedule of crosscountry speeches. Near the end of the tour the breakdown came in the form of a thrombosis and partial paralysis. From then on until the inauguration of Harding, the U.S. was in fact without a President. Around Wilson hovered his physician, his political aide, and his fiercely protective wife. This was a period shrouded in mystery and the author has here drawn from contemporary notes and interviews (again allow for lapse of memory and personal bias) for what seems to be a fairly comprehensive view of the President at this time- physically ravaged, given to helpless bursts of emotion but burning still with a fierce sense of mission, an ""eagle chained to a rock""...

Pub Date: Feb. 5th, 1963
Publisher: Morrow