WHEN THE CHEERING HAD TO STOP by Gene Smith

WHEN THE CHEERING HAD TO STOP

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KIRKUS REVIEW

After W.W.I, President Woodrow Wilson set out on a grueling schedule of cross country speeches in an effort to convince the electorate that his program for world peace deserved support. Near the end of the tour his breakdown came in the form of a thrombosis and partial paralysis. From then until the inauguration of Harding, the U.S. was in fact without a President. Around Wilson hovered his physician, his political aide and his fiercely protective second wife. This was a period shrouded in mystery and the author has drawn his book from contemporary notes and interviews (allowance should be made for lapses of memory and personal bias) and presents what seems to be a fairly comprehensive view of Wilson at this time -- ""an eagle chained to a rock"".

Pub Date: Feb. 5th, 1964
Publisher: Morrow