THE BERLIN DIARIES by General X

THE BERLIN DIARIES

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KIRKUS REVIEW

If this book had been published a year ago, it would have been an unquestioned sensation. Coming today, after so much revelatory and first hand data from Nazi Germany, it seems a bit ""dated"" and inconclusive. And, furthermore, it is not presented in a form that challenges interest and makes for easy selling to the ""man in the street"". In spite of these barriers to popular sale, the book should receive serious attention. An unknown general, writing under the onigmatic ""General X"" (one of Schleicher's chief addes while he was Minister of War and Chancellor) writes from first hand knowledge of events in Germany from the fall of Bruening, in June 1932, to the triumph of Hitler, January 1933. Hitler, von Papen, Goering, Goebels, Hindenberg and many other leading figures in Germany are mercilessly revealed and the seamy side of German's political and economic life is exposed to view. The emphasis is on political intrigue, preparedness for a war of reprisal, opportunism, the rotten structure of Germany today, heading Europe to destruction. Important for the student of modern history; for public libraries.

Pub Date: June 13th, 1934
Publisher: Morrow