ELIZABETH AND PHILIP by Geoffrey Bocca

ELIZABETH AND PHILIP

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The development of a young princess into a Queen size sovereign, and her husband achieving an expertness in the business of royalty, presents a double portrait (and sometimes a double-take) readied for the coming Coronation. The spontaneous devotion of her subjects, her youth and war years, her romance in a newsreel age parallel Philip's homeless, countryless young years, his love of sports, his refusal to fit into the accepted mold, and his settling down from a royal waif and stray into a place of his own as the eyes and ears and the conductor of the common touch for his wife. There's lots of detail here -- Elizabeth's ""bloody minded"" (obstinate) qualities, so like all Britons, her madness for horses, her days of being ""overstuffed and overdressed"", her wedding and travels and children, and the transformation with the responsibilities and accession: Philip's care-free, military life and his adjustment to the necessary formalities of his married state. And the exhilaration and expectancy with which they have endowed their empire top off this view-with-pride open season on these crowned heads. Lofty gossiping for the loyal.

Pub Date: April 27th, 1953
Publisher: Holt