ROGER TORY PETERSON'S DOZEN BIRDING HOT SPOTS by George H. Harrison

ROGER TORY PETERSON'S DOZEN BIRDING HOT SPOTS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Guided by the experienced opinions of Roger Tory Peterson, Harrison and his wife Kit set out to see the best birding places on the continent. . . in a single year. To be at each site at the optimal time, they planned carefully--one day can make a difference--and the statistics they logged are impressive: 32,693 miles traveled, 402 species sighted. Crisscrossing North America, they saw anhingas and spoonbills in the Everglades in January, the sandhill cranes of the Platte River in late March, the warblers and water birds of Mount Desert Island in June, raptors over Hawk Mountain in mid-September. At times they visited two or three places in one week because weather conditions and migration patterns often correspond at various locations; at other times they would stay a week or so, adding to their list (in Texas--66 species in four hours), usually with a local naturalist along. Besides the bird lore--nesting and mating habits, coloration and feeding, favored trails--they provide numerous tourist tips: clothing needed, food and lodging available, travel approaches, where to watch for mosquitoes. . . but they don't recommend duplicating their oneyear time limit. Less generous in its coverage than Olin Sewall Pettingill's The Bird Watcher's America (but with surprisingly little overlap), this is a bonus for birders--nonstop enthusiasm and the low-down on some highfliers.

Pub Date: Nov. 1st, 1976
Publisher: Simon & Schuster