A SONG FOR HANA & THE SPIRIT OF LEHO'ULA by George Kinder

A SONG FOR HANA & THE SPIRIT OF LEHO'ULA

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A poetic and vividly illustrated tribute to a pristine stretch of Hawaiian beach.

Readers familiar with this certified financial planner and former tax accountant’s philosophic musings and practical advice on wealth (Lighting the Torch: The Kinder Method â„¢ of Life Planning, 2006, etc.) may find this ecological encomium to Leho’ula, a tiny plot of Maui coastline, an odd topic for Kinder–especially when they learn that this defense of the land has been inspired by the threat of development. (The marketing plan for the book includes a 50 percent donation of the proceeds “dedicated to save the Hana coast from development and to support traditional Hawaiian culture.”) This richly produced edition includes his own photographs, poems and short prose reflections, which summon the ancient Hawaiian gods for a metaphysical communion on this sacred ground. Says Pig God Kamapua’a, “Hana means the breath of spirit and its work. Do your work. Master what you do. Bring the land back to the people. […] Love what feeds you, love your resources, love your fire, love what challenges you, love your enemies–I love pigs man–but love!” Kinder’s other recurrent theme emphasizes the vitality of the land in one’s inner life: “This earth is a garden / Its aromas, its breezes / and its light: flavors of consciousness / Lava bridges from another world / to the one where we are meant to live.” While these messages will appeal to the ecologically minded, especially those from Hawaii, the volume’s many photographs make the most convincing case for preservation. One look at the verdant grassland abutting a foamy sea or a beautifully composed silhouette of the tree line against a flaming purple sky, and even the most profit-driven developer will reconsider his plans. Includes 111 color images, 82 photos and 29 scans.

One man’s homage to the place he calls home.

Pub Date: June 23rd, 2007
ISBN: 978-0-9791743-2-2
Program: Kirkus Indie
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