WAITING IN THE NIGHT by George Millar

WAITING IN THE NIGHT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

An English newspaperman, Millar determined on a unique role, even though it might and in ""useful death"". He trained in England as a Maquis, was dropped by parachute near Dijon as Captain Emile, worked under a young Frenchman already showing signs of nerves, head of the Besancon area. Hating the indoor hiding, he exchanged it for the less comfortable but freer conditions as he went to the hills to instruct two groups of Maquis, and there encountered th picaresque and picturesque colonial, oulaya. Dangerous days of sabotage and searches, of manoeuvers directed against railway focal points, of thefts, disguises, with Germans and Cossacks as double enemy, and the French villagers as sources of subsistence and security. Lots of color here -- some of it a little high -- for a full first person narrative, often exciting.

Pub Date: Jan. 10th, 1945
Publisher: Doubleday, Doran