THE MADHOUSE ON MADISON STREET by George Murray

THE MADHOUSE ON MADISON STREET

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Madhouse is a rowdy, wonderful account of the deathless newsmen and editorial giants of Hearst's Chicago American. The paper was started in 1902 as Citizen Hearst's first step toward the Presidency. At that time he already owned the San Francisco Examiner, the New York Journal, $50,000.000, and a top post in the Democratic party. With these three influentially located papers, and as many more as he needed, Hearst conceived that he might be President by 1904. Thirty years later he still hadn't given up hope. The Madhouse was the Hearst Building in which a morning and an afternoon daily were published. When the city room got too quiet the editor would yell, ""Everybody get excited!"" Everybody would, and richly sensational prose poured out of the typewriters. As Westbrook Fegler's father once described it, ""A Hearst newspaper is like a screaming woman running down the street with her throat cut."" For this unkind reference to Hearst's thirst for red ink mixed with yellow journalism, the elder Pegler was fired. The stories herein tell as much about the reporters and editors involved as about the bandits, murders and scoops described. There's not a dull page, just like the American.

Pub Date: Feb. 15th, 1965
Publisher: Follett