THE TREE IDENTIFICATION BOOK by George W.D. Symonds
Kirkus Star

THE TREE IDENTIFICATION BOOK

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Here is ""a new method for the practical identification and recognition of trees"", the author a landscape architect and naturalist, resident of Connecticut; the photographer (there are 1539 pictures), Stephen V. Chelminski, was a staff member on a leading magazine. At last it seems to me there is a foolproof book for the layman, based on visual presentation of details essential for identification and recognition. The aim is to learn to observe such details as can be clearly seen, for identification purposes; and to familiarize oneself with features so that trees are recognizable for genus at a glance, and for species on closer observation. The real problem of subdivision of species into varieties is not the aim of this book, which is not intended primarily for the botanist. A simple section of instructions on how to use the pictorial keys for genus identification, and the master pages for species, makes this of value as a practical reference book. It is not intended as a field guide, as it measures roughly 9"" x 11"". Such features as leaves, flowers, fruit, buds, bark, etc. are grouped for comparative study. Odd factors are noted such as ""sticky buds"" -- or ""Most poplars have flat stems"". The section on bark-showing the scale of the tree trunk, is the most comprehensive and efficient, handling of the subject I have encountered, and is one of the factors that makes this a useful book at any season. From Maine to North Dakota, and south to Texas and northern Florida, this should prove an invaluable asset for private, public and school libraries.

Pub Date: March 19th, 1958
Publisher: Morrow-Barrows