NUMBERLAND by George Weinberg

NUMBERLAND

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KIRKUS REVIEW

From the psychiatrist author of several non-fiction books, a harmless but dull and highly improbable little parable whose message is: only by accepting the fact that we are going to die can we fund meaning, purpose and joy in life. Numberland, you see, is where numbers live. Small numbers live in Numeropolis; larger numbers live further afield in progressively larger cities; the large numbers fetch and carry for the small numbers. These ""digits"" have no sex, of course, neither do they have hair; they do walk and talk, though, and wear clothes and even eyeglasses. Numberland is an orderly and logical place (Weinberg evidently has never heard of irrational numbers) until SIX becomes curious about humans, who are mortal; after talking with a human mathematician, SIX realizes that mortality gives humans their drive to create. Digits, apparently immortal, have no such hope. Numberland society collapses--until SIX comes to understand that humans create numbers, so that when all humans are gone, numbers will be too. Therefore numbers are mortal also. Oh frabjous day! Sorry, wrong number.

Pub Date: March 2nd, 1987
Publisher: St. Martin's