UNDER SATAN'S SUN by Georges Bernanos

UNDER SATAN'S SUN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

First published in 1926 and long unavailable in English translation, this vivid debut novel by the eminent French Catholic author (1888–1948) is a solid stepping-stone pointing toward the greater achievements of Bernanos's Diary of a Country Priest and The Impostor. It examines the fervent religiosity of a rural cleric given to self-flagellation and delusions of godlike powers—in his dealings with a farm girl betrayed into prostitution, a dying child, and, in its astonishing central section, Satan himself (in the guise of a garrulous horse-trader). Episodic, indifferently constructed, and often hyperbolic, yet suffused with a dramatic intensity that makes one understand why Bernanos has sometimes been likened to Dostoevsky. Not all readers will agree, but Under Satan's Sun should not be missed.

Pub Date: Sept. 20th, 2001
ISBN: 0-8032-6180-2
Page count: 257pp
Publisher: Univ. of Nebraska