THE CAMBRIDGE PLATONISTS by Gerald R--Ed. Cragg

THE CAMBRIDGE PLATONISTS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The group of English theologians traditionally known as ""The Cambridge Platonists"" form an important link between medieval Christian theology and the thought of the modern world. Their center was Emmanuel College, Cambridge University, and they taught and wrote in the midst of the struggle between Puritanism and the Church of England. Though not Puritans themselves -- they rejected dogmatic Calvinism and opposed the rigidity of Archbishop Laud. Calmly reasonable, ethically strong-minded, and even mystical in certain aspects of their thought, they represented a new theological style. In particular they showed a wide interest in science, philosophy, and classical learning. Although deeply indebted to Plato, the name ""Platonists"" is hardly accurate. Their concern with the question of the relationship of faith to reason makes much of their writing pertinent today. The editor brings together substantial parts of the work of four of the most significant of this group of thinkers: Whichcote, Smith, Cudworth, and More; and in addition to an introductory essay, offers introductions and notes to these selections. A substantial reference work for student and scholar.

Pub Date: Oct. 24th, 1968
Publisher: Oxford