THE MAN WHO FEELS LEFT BEHIND by Gerald W. Johnson

THE MAN WHO FEELS LEFT BEHIND

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The man who feels left behind, according to Gerald Johnson, is the intelligent citizen who naturally finds it impossible to master those new ideas (in mathematics and physics, for example) which have a direct bearing on his life but who is responsible, as voter, for dealing with their implications. It is Mr. Johnson's opinion that the battle today, as always, is the ""conquest of inner space"", and that ""We stand today in precisely the danger in which Neanderthal man stood when he faced a large enemy with a club"". What is imperative, in his view, is that man should apply his common sense and understanding to the selection of good men to conduct public affairs. He elaborates on this theme in chapters dealing with civil rights; Galbraith's thesis that the importance of the American standard of living is small by comparison with that of the American standard of life; the necessity for political controversy; the problems of the American city, and finally the imperative for commitment to the twentieth century. Gerald Johnson always writes with perspicuity and wit. Possibly, however, it will be felt that his argument errs on the side of optimism. One of the chapters, To Live and Die in Dixie appeared in the Atlantic Monthly, July 1960.

Publisher: Morrow