A MAN NAMED WASHINGTON; A MAN NAMED LINCOLN by Gertrude Norman

A MAN NAMED WASHINGTON; A MAN NAMED LINCOLN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A reexamination of these books raises again the question of their contribution to be a basic understanding of the roles Washington and Lincoln played in the history of the country. Granted- beginning readers have little or no background, unless they are given it at home, and when the holidays come around they are apt to be spoonfed the hackneyed legends -- the cherry tree, the broken colt; the spelling out the books by firelight and pine kindlings, etc. Gertrude Norman has attempted to give a concise, overall, and within the limits of space and vocabulary, a sound foundation on which later reading and understanding will be formed. That she tends to over-simplify to the point of dullness is probably what made the reader of the galleys and the reporting-back in December (p. 877 (J-363))- almost aggressively antagonistic. In final analysis, the books serve a purpose, and since more are in the offing, we can only hope a slightly more sensitive handling of material will give the figures chosen more warmth and personality. Watch for later publications. And in using this, try to supplement them as soon as technically possible for beginning readers, with richer material.

Publisher: Putnam