AMERICA'S NAVY IN WORLD WAR II by Gilbert Cant

AMERICA'S NAVY IN WORLD WAR II

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The New York Post's Editor and author of The War At Sea synthesizes the outstanding naval operations of this war so that the public may get a more comprehensive, overall picture of the Navy's role. There is implicit some criticism of the too strict curtailment of news and the danger of the public's reliance on enemy reports. Opening chapters cover naval policy, which Cant claims is a democratic one, and he weighs the pros and cons of air and sea power, upholding the conjunction of the two. Then, in cleancut fashion, he goes on to the naval battles of this war, of Pearl Harbor, of the Philippines, the Dutch East Indies, Wake, Midway, the Solomons and the Aleutians, the Mediterranean and the Atlantic. Ships and men already of heroic statures, with -- he claims -- some information wholly new for the public. To the layman and for the layman, it seems a readable roundup of the war at sea. Appendices include list of our ships, Allied and Enemy estimated naval losses, decorations, etc.

Pub Date: July 21st, 1943
Publisher: John Day