CAPTAIN FLINN AND THE PIRATE DINOSAURS

MISSING TREASURE!

The creators of Captain Flinn and the Pirate Dinosaurs (2005) again chuck lots of promising elements together—evidently in hopes that they’ll assemble themselves into an exciting, or at least coherent, yarn. They don’t. Shortly after pausing in awe before the huge skeleton of a Giganotosaurus on a class trip to the museum, Flinn and friends fall through a wardrobe—er, closet and find themselves aboard a ship heading for Bag O’ Bones Island, where they fight scaly pirates to recover a treasure stolen from the aforementioned museum. Enter Giganotosaurus at the climax, as a towering pirate who hardly gets to roar before he’s reduced to jelly by the sight of a tiny spider. Ayto illustrates the sketchy plot with frenzied cartoon collages featuring lots of big teeth, jumbled action and a ship that looks like a fugitive from a Monty Python animation. Young readers will give this a perfunctory once-over at best; set them instead on a course for the more seaworthy likes of Deb Lund’s Dinosailors (2003), illustrated by Howard Fine. (Picture book. 6-8)

Pub Date: Oct. 7, 2008

ISBN: 978-1-4169-6745-3

Page Count: 32

Publisher: McElderry

Review Posted Online: June 24, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2008

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HOW I BECAME A PIRATE

Thanks to parrot-toting Braidbeard and his gloriously disreputable crew, a lad discovers the ups and downs of a pirate’s life in this rousing mini-epic. His mom and dad busy on another part of the beach, young Jeremy happily joins a band of hook-handed, eye-patched, snaggle-toothed pirates aboard their ship, learning pirate table manners (none), enjoying a game of nautical soccer until a shark eats the ball, then happily retiring without having to brush teeth, or even don pajamas. But then Jeremy learns that pirates don’t get tucked in, or get bedtime stories, and as for good night kisses—Avast! Worse yet, no one offers comfort when a storm hits. So, giving over the pirate’s life, Jeremy shows the crew where to bury its treasure (his backyard), and bids them goodbye. Shannon outfits Braidbeard’s leering, pop-eyed lot in ragged but colorful pirate dress, and gives his young ruffian-in-training a belt and bandanna to match. This isn’t likely to turn pirate wannabees into landlubbers, but it will inspire a chorus of yo-ho-hos. (Picture book. 6-8)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2003

ISBN: 0-15-201848-4

Page Count: 44

Publisher: Harcourt

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 2003

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Formulaic but not stale…even if it does mine previous topical material rather than expand it.

HOW DO DINOSAURS SHOW GOOD MANNERS?

From the How Do Dinosaurs…? series

A guide to better behavior—at home, on the playground, in class, and in the library.

Serving as a sort of overview for the series’ 12 previous exercises in behavior modeling, this latest outing opens with a set of badly behaving dinos, identified in an endpaper key and also inconspicuously in situ. Per series formula, these are paired to leading questions like “Does she spit out her broccoli onto the floor? / Does he shout ‘I hate meat loaf!’ while slamming the door?” (Choruses of “NO!” from young audiences are welcome.) Midway through, the tone changes (“No, dinosaurs don’t”), and good examples follow to the tune of positive declarative sentences: “They wipe up the tables and vacuum the floors. / They share all the books and they never slam doors,” etc. Teague’s customary, humongous prehistoric crew, all depicted in exact detail and with wildly flashy coloration, fill both their spreads and their human-scale scenes as their human parents—no same-sex couples but some are racially mixed, and in one the man’s the cook—join a similarly diverse set of sibs and other children in either disapprobation or approving smiles. All in all, it’s a well-tested mix of oblique and prescriptive approaches to proper behavior as well as a lighthearted way to play up the use of “please,” “thank you,” and even “I’ll help when you’re hurt.”

Formulaic but not stale…even if it does mine previous topical material rather than expand it. (Picture book. 6-8)

Pub Date: Oct. 20, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-338-36334-0

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Blue Sky/Scholastic

Review Posted Online: Aug. 18, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2020

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