While odes on the wonderfulness of dads are plentiful, this stands out for its spot-on execution and colorful charm.

I LOVE MY DADDY

Andreae and Dodd team up again (I Love My Mommy, 2011) to create a sweet look at all the fun a round-faced toddler and daddy experience together.

A pleasingly rhythmic text paired with oversized illustrations in black-outlined saturated brights ensures instant appeal for the youngest readers. Child and dad make pancakes, “play horsies,” sing songs, dance, go on the swings, watch television, share pizza and cuddle at bedtime. Stars in muted colors pepper the backgrounds on most of the pages, becoming vibrant on the final page as a bedcover pattern. The smiling narrator declares, “My daddy’s such a lovely man, / In fact, I am his BIGGEST fan!” The delight is in the details: Toddlers and preschoolers will enjoy looking for the slightly gray bunny on most pages, while parents will nod at the occasional mess of batter splattered on the kitchen counter and cookie crumbs scattered over the sofa.

While odes on the wonderfulness of dads are plentiful, this stands out for its spot-on execution and colorful charm. (Picture book. 1-4)

Pub Date: April 17, 2012

ISBN: 978-1-4231-4328-4

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Disney-Hyperion

Review Posted Online: March 18, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 2012

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It’s nothing new, but it’s also clearly heartfelt.

LOVE YOU MORE

A love song from parents to their child.

This title will seem quite similar to the many others about parents’ deep love for their children. The text is wholly composed of first-person declarations of parental love, and it’s juxtaposed with illustrations of the child with one or both parents. It’s not always clear who the “I” speaking is, and there are a few pages that instead use “we.” Most sentences begin with “I love you more” phrasing to communicate that nothing could undermine parental love: “I love you more than all the sleepless nights…and all the early, tired mornings.” The accompanying pictures depict the child as a baby with weary parents. Later spreads show the child growing up, and the phrasing shifts away from the challenges of parenting to its joys and to attempts to quantify love: “I love you more than all the blades of grass at the park…and all the soccer that we played.” Throughout, Bell’s illustrations use pastel tones and soft visual texture to depict cozy, wholesome scenes that are largely redundant of the straightforward, warm text. They feature a brown-haired family with a mother, father, and child, who all appear to be white (though the father has skin that’s a shade darker than the others’).

It’s nothing new, but it’s also clearly heartfelt. (Picture book. 2-4)

Pub Date: Aug. 14, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-4998-0652-6

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Little Bee

Review Posted Online: June 25, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2018

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Pretty but ephemeral.

I LOVE YOU LITTLE ONE

This board-book entry in the competitive-loving genre features silhouettes of animal parent-child pairs against variously colored nighttime scenes.

Each spread begins with the same question, presumably voiced by the child: “How much do you love me?” The parent’s response reaches for lyricism, not always successfully, and always includes a comparative statement. “I love you more than the moon’s glowing light,” says the parent rabbit in the first spread, while the elephant parent avows, “I love you more than all the stars at night,” in the second, establishing the rhyming pattern. Other animals include whales, monkeys, penguins, owls, wolves, and cats; each animal in the pair is labeled with the generic for the adult and the specialized term for that animal’s young for the child. Patane’s scenes are striking enough, the black animals and foreground settings making for striking contrast with the scenery in the background. Lloyd’s verse scans fine, but it can seem desperate, as when the owl responds, “I love you more than the fluffiest feathers,” in order to rhyme with the penguin’s “I love you more than snowy weather.” The book is weighted down by its final page, which holds a battery that allows readers to illuminate the moon on the cover with tiny LED bulbs when an icon is pressed. Despite this gimmick, this book feels little different from many of its peers.

Pretty but ephemeral. (Board book. 1-3)

Pub Date: Dec. 4, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-4654-8016-3

Page Count: 18

Publisher: DK Publishing

Review Posted Online: Dec. 5, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2019

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