Ideas that looked thin for a single book stretched beyond all reasonable elasticity.

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THE SOUND OF SEAS

From the The Earthend Saga series , Vol. 3

Final part of the X-Files–ish trilogy (A Dream of Ice, 2015, etc.) about contact with an ancient civilization now buried under the Antarctic ice.

The civilization of Galderkhaan destroyed itself in a power struggle between Priests and Technologists. But some of them survived by becoming spirits, sort of; still others fled and persisted into the present, of which a group, known as the Group, plan to do—well, something—by means of the stone tiles which are both computers and power sources. Previously, child psychologist Caitlin O’Hara discovered supernatural links between seemingly unrelated global weird events and, somehow, acquired strange new abilities. Meanwhile, archaeologist Mikel Jasso, a field agent for the Group, found an entire city buried beneath the Antarctic ice and collected some of the mysterious tiles. In the past, meanwhile, where Caitlin finds herself in another body, the Priests and Technologists are battling over a power source known as, you guessed it, the Source. Mikel, still in Antarctica, learns that the Group has been taken over by Casey Skett, who’s not averse to burning a few people to death in order to learn how to control the tiles. Plenty of classic X-Files plot ingredients, then, but nobody to stand in for Mulder the believer and Scully the skeptic and do some real investigating. Despite the hardworking narrative, even dedicated trilogy fans might not be happy with the obvious padding and tepid plot. And the resolution neither satisfies nor adds up.

Ideas that looked thin for a single book stretched beyond all reasonable elasticity.

Pub Date: Sept. 13, 2016

ISBN: 978-1-476-77659-0

Page Count: 304

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: June 21, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2016

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A tasty, if not always tasteful, tale of supernatural mayhem that fans of King and Crichton alike will enjoy.

DEVOLUTION

Are we not men? We are—well, ask Bigfoot, as Brooks does in this delightful yarn, following on his bestseller World War Z (2006).

A zombie apocalypse is one thing. A volcanic eruption is quite another, for, as the journalist who does a framing voice-over narration for Brooks’ latest puts it, when Mount Rainier popped its cork, “it was the psychological aspect, the hyperbole-fueled hysteria that had ended up killing the most people.” Maybe, but the sasquatches whom the volcano displaced contributed to the statistics, too, if only out of self-defense. Brooks places the epicenter of the Bigfoot war in a high-tech hideaway populated by the kind of people you might find in a Jurassic Park franchise: the schmo who doesn’t know how to do much of anything but tries anyway, the well-intentioned bleeding heart, the know-it-all intellectual who turns out to know the wrong things, the immigrant with a tough backstory and an instinct for survival. Indeed, the novel does double duty as a survival manual, packed full of good advice—for instance, try not to get wounded, for “injury turns you from a giver to a taker. Taking up our resources, our time to care for you.” Brooks presents a case for making room for Bigfoot in the world while peppering his narrative with timely social criticism about bad behavior on the human side of the conflict: The explosion of Rainier might have been better forecast had the president not slashed the budget of the U.S. Geological Survey, leading to “immediate suspension of the National Volcano Early Warning System,” and there’s always someone around looking to monetize the natural disaster and the sasquatch-y onslaught that follows. Brooks is a pro at building suspense even if it plays out in some rather spectacularly yucky episodes, one involving a short spear that takes its name from “the sucking sound of pulling it out of the dead man’s heart and lungs.” Grossness aside, it puts you right there on the scene.

A tasty, if not always tasteful, tale of supernatural mayhem that fans of King and Crichton alike will enjoy.

Pub Date: June 16, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-9848-2678-7

Page Count: 304

Publisher: Del Rey/Ballantine

Review Posted Online: Feb. 10, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2020

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Amateurish, with a twist savvy readers will see coming from a mile away.

THE SILENT PATIENT

A woman accused of shooting her husband six times in the face refuses to speak.

"Alicia Berenson was thirty-three years old when she killed her husband. They had been married for seven years. They were both artists—Alicia was a painter, and Gabriel was a well-known fashion photographer." Michaelides' debut is narrated in the voice of psychotherapist Theo Faber, who applies for a job at the institution where Alicia is incarcerated because he's fascinated with her case and believes he will be able to get her to talk. The narration of the increasingly unrealistic events that follow is interwoven with excerpts from Alicia's diary. Ah, yes, the old interwoven diary trick. When you read Alicia's diary you'll conclude the woman could well have been a novelist instead of a painter because it contains page after page of detailed dialogue, scenes, and conversations quite unlike those in any journal you've ever seen. " 'What's the matter?' 'I can't talk about it on the phone, I need to see you.' 'It's just—I'm not sure I can make it up to Cambridge at the minute.' 'I'll come to you. This afternoon. Okay?' Something in Paul's voice made me agree without thinking about it. He sounded desperate. 'Okay. Are you sure you can't tell me about it now?' 'I'll see you later.' Paul hung up." Wouldn't all this appear in a diary as "Paul wouldn't tell me what was wrong"? An even more improbable entry is the one that pins the tail on the killer. While much of the book is clumsy, contrived, and silly, it is while reading passages of the diary that one may actually find oneself laughing out loud.

Amateurish, with a twist savvy readers will see coming from a mile away.

Pub Date: Feb. 5, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-250-30169-7

Page Count: 304

Publisher: Celadon Books

Review Posted Online: Nov. 4, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 15, 2018

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