A GERMAN PRINTER AN IRISH PILGRIM by Giovanni--Ed. Caselli

A GERMAN PRINTER AN IRISH PILGRIM

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Two new entries in the editor's ""Everyday Life of. . ."" series, the first set in Nuremberg in 1485, the second in Ireland and France around 600. Using both fictional and historical figures, each recounts a series of events chosen to demonstrate the life of the time. Martin, a printer's son, is friend to the young Albrecht Durer, who would rather be a painter than follow his father as a goldsmith. Incidents are transparently designed to take Martin to a paper mill and the master printer, Koberger; a fair amount of information about the techniques and environs of early printing is conveyed, but is burdened by the inconsequential plot. Finbar leaves his Bangor monastery with two monks, following St. Columbanus, who had traveled to France and established several monasteries there. The journey takes them on a dangerous Channel crossing, to Paris, and south to the mountains, where they hear of Columbanus' death at Bobble in Italy. Although Columbanus had been almost 30 years on his mission, his followers seem to age little on their long quest. The full-color illustrations are serviceable, adding many details of costumes, architecture, and objects common at the time; they hold more drama than the clumsy texts and should help to popularize these vignettes of history. The ""picture glossaries"" on the last two pages of each book are, in each case, a meager offering with little detail.

Pub Date: March 1st, 1987
Page count: 29pp
Publisher: Peter Bedrick--dist. by Harper & Row