THE WORKING MOTHER'S COMPLETE HANDBOOK by Gloria & Jo Ann Miller Norris

THE WORKING MOTHER'S COMPLETE HANDBOOK

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A potpourri of fact, book and agency references, case histories, and practical tips designed to complement a basic premise: that working outside the home enriches not only mothers' lives but those of their husbands and children. Sometimes the difficulties are simply minimized; thus, in 150 interviews, the authors encountered ""pervasive signs that. . . exclusive, intensive mothering produces strains,"" without acknowledging that the very existence of their book is evidence that non-exclusive mothering can be strain-producing too. But since over half the mothers of young children now work, its real value lies in step-by-step suggestions, particularly in the areas of child care and home organization: how to interview, choose, and pay home caregivers (""a sitter should not just sit""), the advantages and disadvantages of day-care centers, and even quickie meal tips that read like a course in Leftovers I. Some of the headings betray an underlying ""us"" and ""them"" conflict: ""Husbands Can Learn,"" ""Good Childcare Can Be Taught,"" etc. In the career sector, there is a realistic assessment of the pros and cons of innovative job arrangements--job sharing, staggered hours, working at home, and most encouraging of all, flexitime. Predictably, EEOC and Title VII entitlements are also detailed, though women are urged to reassure prospective employers about childcare arrangements, nonetheless. Weakest as it pertains to the individual (relationships, support systems for the single mother, etc.) this is nevertheless on-target in the social sphere.

Pub Date: June 28th, 1979
Publisher: Dutton