VINNIE REAM: The Story of the Girl Who Sculptured Lincoln by Gordon Langley Hall

VINNIE REAM: The Story of the Girl Who Sculptured Lincoln

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Vinnie Ream may accurately be described as ""fleetingly famous""; she was barely twenty when she was chosen from many applicants to sculpture a statue of Lincoln for the Capitol building. A year before, she had been given permission to sculpt the President while he worked at his desk. As portrayed in this biography, Vinnie's main characteristics were her ability as a sculptress, and her beauty, which lured many a man, from Cherokee to European. She appears here as a charmer who moved in a circle with the greats of her time. The author claims enthusiasm and exuberance for his subject, but these attributes are seldom seen in the young lass, except when she is involved with her Lincoln masterpiece. The glimpses of famous people are interesting, but Vinnie is not made a strong enough character here around whom to construct a unique, or interesting picture, of the nineteenth century.

Pub Date: April 22nd, 1963
Publisher: Holt, Rinehart & Winston