THE BRITISH PARLIAMENT by Gordon Strathearn

THE BRITISH PARLIAMENT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Written on grounds of a sadly lacking general knowledge of parliament, its history and activities and possible changes, a quiet, extensive survey of the British governmental institution. With the idea of parliament's renown and fairness as his professed bias, Mr Strathearn delves first into history and origins- the Witenagemot, 1066; 1215, the start of Tory and Whig; and the pecularities of the constitution today. Then come functions, the members and their duties and the physical set up of the Palace of Westminster itself. The work of the House of Commons gets a thorough going over in a chapter presenting the details of procedure and the presenting and passing of bills; and in discussion of the criticisms of parliament- is it too clumsy an organ for modern exigencies, too small to handle growing responsibilities, the author quotes from the Webbs who advocated a third or industrial parliament- from Viscount Cecil who feared the growing power of the cabinet. A good introductory survey which certainly will not bore someone who knows a little about government already and wants to find out about the British one. There's a glossary too, of parliamentary terms.

Pub Date: Oct. 20th, 1952
Publisher: Praeger