THE PERSON IN PSYCHOLOGY by Gordon W. Allport

THE PERSON IN PSYCHOLOGY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

To speak of ""the person in psychology"" is as all-encompassing as speaking of ""the chemicals in chemistry"" or of ""the words in philology."" And, indeed, the scope of this collection of twenty-one essays is as broad as its title is comprehensive, running the gamut of psychology from social aspects of personal behavior to structural dynamic components, practical problems of guidance, expression, and pedagogy. The book, however, achieves a certain cohesiveness, and even unity, by virtue of the four categories into which most of the essays fit quite neatly: the model for the person; conditions for growth of the person; the role of prejudice in personality; and, quite literally, ""persons""--i.e., psychological delvings into the personalities of such individuals as William James and Karl Buhler. For all of its eclectic nature (and the author's chapter on eclecticism is the best in the book), this work stands out for several reasons: the cogency of his opinions and the lucidity with which they are expressed; the author's prestigious name which will give the literate layman an authoritative glimpse into the quasi-occult world of the human psyche; and the very complete bibliography of the literature on the subject from 1921 to 1967 which will be valuable for all professionals.

Pub Date: Jan. 19th, 1967
Publisher: Beacon