THE LOVE FEAST by Graham Kerr

THE LOVE FEAST

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KIRKUS REVIEW

As in The New Seasoning (1976), Kerr continues his crusade against the excesses of godless gourmet cookery, but this new work could do with a bit less leavening. The steamroller style of his early Seventies TV appearances is still in evidence, but that is virtually all that remains, for Kerr has turned his family's born-again conversions into models for ail, and substantially amended the shop, ping list: out with costly haute cuisine ingredients and saucy recipes, bring on the fresh vegetables and pure foods menus. The advantages of regular exercise, the controversy surrounding chemicals, and the deficiencies of salt, sugar, animal fats, etc., are introduced as if first discovered, and further invested with religious significance (""Jesus wants us humble, not puffed up""). The recipes themselves are generally acceptable, many quite compatible with popular interests in more nutritious foods, and not all require critical substitutions, although Kerr again sings the praises of red grape juice in the Boeuf Bourguignonne or chicken livers. He also passes the collection plate, suggesting that food bill savings be sent ""to a responsible Christian ministry."" No gallop here--more like running in place.

Pub Date: Aug. 1st, 1978
Publisher: Simon & Schuster