THROUGH CHINA'S WALL by Graham Peck

THROUGH CHINA'S WALL

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This too was reported earlier, 10/1/39, when the book was scheduled for Fall publication. A colorful, dramatic account of a year spent in China by an artist who had an infinite curiosity about the country, its ways and its people. Uncomfortably he sensed the growing infiltration of Japan, during the period he spent in Peking; he escaped it for a time as he went out on the Gobi Desert, as he stayed in Mongol camps, and then once more he met it in Mongolia, in Shanghai. He went up the Yangtze River, he stayed in Chingking, which he visualizes as the center of the new China of the South, he traveled by motor, on horseback, on donkey back, by steamer, by sampan. He visited cities and villages and plains. He drank in the old and the new. He saw the people at close quarters. And he painted a vivid picture of a China that is no more.

Pub Date: Jan. 30th, 1939
Publisher: Houghton, Mifflin