BEYOND ARABIAN SANDS by Grant C. Butler

BEYOND ARABIAN SANDS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Mr. Butler, who is a successful lecturer, blends political commentary and ravelogue in a view of the Arab world that has the length and breadth of fifteen years' experience. This is reportage at its most personal, and the author neither disguises nor ever really acknowledges the almost wholly sentimental foundations of his opinions. He has included here some interesting conversations with such men as King Hussein and Musa bey Alami of Jordan, Hassan of Morocco, Ben Bella of Algeria, and Nasser of Egypt -- who, for example, assures us that he could never become a communist because he believes in God. There are also some good sketches of average people, and always revealing details about Mr. Butler himself, determinedly pursuing his image of T.E. Lawrence. There is a postscript describing Middle Eastern cuisine, and one disclaiming Islamic responsibility for the Black Muslim movement. The questions posed by this part of the world today are crucial, and both the cause of Arab unity and the need for Arab-Israeli approchement are of tremendous importance; but just as surely, our understanding of these matters calls for a weightier consideration than has been attempted here.

Pub Date: March 17th, 1964
Publisher: evin-Adair