Graphic Novels & Comic Books Book Reviews

FAITH by Jody Houser
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: July 5, 2016

"You go, girl. (Graphic fantasy. 12 & up)"
Fat and fierce superhero Zephyr—aka Faith Herbert—leaves the Harbinger Resistance to fly solo. Read full book review >
LOVE by Frédéric Brrémaud
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: July 12, 2016

"Astonishingly beautiful but narratively obscure. (Graphic adventure. 10 & up)"
The companion to Love: The Fox and Love: The Tiger (both 2015) takes its setting on the African savanna, where a male lion travels on the fringes of a pride. Read full book review >

A MATTER OF LIFE AND DEATH by Alexis Deacon
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: July 26, 2016

"Readers will give themselves over to the dreamlike, immersive narrative, trusting that Volume 2, A Game Without Rules will be along soon. (Graphic fantasy. 12 & up)"
Fifty souls of diverse race and gender gather to witness the passing of great chief Matarka, and one of them will be her successor—if that person can win the cruelly arbitrary contest governed by the sorceress Niope. Read full book review >
MARCH by John Lewis
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"This memoir's unique eyewitness view of epochal events makes it essential reading for an understanding of those times—and these. (Graphic memoir. 11 & up)"
A living icon of the civil rights movement brings his frank and stirring account of the movement's most tumultuous years (so far) to a climax. Read full book review >
THE GOLDEN COMPASS by Stéphane Melchior-Durand
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 20, 2016

"An engaging adaptation, but some may wish to wait until all three volumes are available. (Graphic fantasy. 11 & up)"
The second volume of the graphic adaptation of Pullman's modern classic follows Lyra's adventures into frozen lands. Read full book review >

SHY by Deborah Freedman
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"An exquisite treasure for bashful readers, animal lovers, and anyone who's ever wanted a friend. (Picture book. 3-7, adult)"
Someone extremely shy finds a friend. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Swan Huntley
June 27, 2016

In Swan Huntley’s debut novel We Could Be Beautiful, Catherine West has spent her entire life surrounded by beautiful things. She owns an immaculate Manhattan apartment, she collects fine art, she buys exquisite handbags and clothing, and she constantly redecorates her home. And yet, despite all this, she still feels empty. One night, at an art opening, Catherine meets William Stockton, a handsome man who shares her impeccable taste and love of beauty. He is educated, elegant, and even has a personal connection—his parents and Catherine's parents were friends years ago. But as he and Catherine grow closer, she begins to encounter strange signs, and her mother, Elizabeth (now suffering from Alzheimer’s), seems to have only bad memories of William as a boy. In Elizabeth’s old diary she finds an unnerving letter from a former nanny that cryptically reads: “We cannot trust anyone . . . “ Is William lying about his past? “Huntley’s debut stands out not for its thrills but rather for her hawkish eye for social detail and razor-sharp wit,” our reviewer writes. “An intoxicating escape; as smart as it is fun.” View video >