Graphic Novels & Comic Books Book Reviews (page 10)

ASTERIOS POLYP by David  Mazzucchelli
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: June 2, 2009

"A visual and even philosophical stunner."
Even by the standards of the graphic novel, this cosmic epic pushes the creative envelope. Read full book review >
THE BETTER MOUSETRAP by Tom Holt
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: May 1, 2009

"Funny and intriguingly complex—a difficult juggling act that Holt carries off with aplomb."
More humor with a British accent—from the prolific Holt, a sequel to The Portable Door (2004) and fourth in a series set in the same science-fantasy universe. Read full book review >

ENEMIES & ALLIES by Kevin J. Anderson
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: May 1, 2009

"<\b>Injects a welcome dose of retro exuberance into the capes-and-tights routine."
Caped Crusader meets Man of Steel in the early 1950s. Read full book review >
BRITTEN AND BRÜLIGHTLY by Hannah Berry
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: April 1, 2009

"This isn't just inspired comics artistry, its inspired artistry."
The graphic novel is treated as film noir in this deftly written, visually stunning debut. Read full book review >
IN THE FLESH by Koren Shadmi
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Feb. 3, 2009

"Not for the squeamish or literal-minded, but in a genre whose artists routinely test all sorts of boundaries, this debut collection obliterates them."
A debut collection of ten short graphic narratives from Israel native Shadmi. Read full book review >

BREAKDOWNS by Art Spiegelman
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Oct. 7, 2008

"Fans of graphic novels in general and Spiegelman in particular will savor this."
A reissue of the graphic artist's early, little-seen volume shows his formative work, while an extensive forword and afterword provide autobiographical context. Read full book review >
AN ANTHOLOGY OF GRAPHIC FICTION, CARTOONS, AND TRUE STORIES by Ivan Brunetti
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Oct. 1, 2008

"The anthology suggests that, thankfully, this extended family isn't close to exhausting its creative potential."
Don't be fooled by the prosaic title or the whiff of pedagogy in the introduction; this is the world of comics—or at least the North American, English-speaking part of that world—at its liveliest. Read full book review >
THE LOST COLONY: BOOK 3 by Grady Klein
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Oct. 1, 2008

"Visually engaging, but otherwise an utter mess."
An absurdly whimsical graphic novel devised with more style than substance. Read full book review >
THE ALCOHOLIC by Jonathan Ames
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Sept. 17, 2008

"Could be the most compelling and provocative work from either collaborator."
Rarely does a collaboration produce a graphic novel of such literary and artistic merit. Read full book review >
GENTLEMAN JIM by Raymond Briggs
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: July 1, 2008

"A short, sweet and meaningful volume."
This slim volume, a reissue of a 1980 work, has seminal significance in the development of the graphic novel. Read full book review >
THE RABBI’S CAT 2 by Joann Sfar
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 2008

"Ranks up there with the most provocative graphic narratives for adults."
The sequel to Sfar's graphic novel about a talking cat. Read full book review >
TURPENTINE by Spring Warren
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

"The journey eventually becomes tedious as Ned fails to establish an identity that satisfies both himself and the reader."
An effete easterner in western guise rambles across the 19th-century American landscape. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
author of SEINFELDIA
August 22, 2016

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s new bestseller Seinfeldia is the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld —the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world. Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly 40 million Americans were tuning in weekly. In Seinfeldia, TV historian and entertainment writer Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!” “Armstrong’s intimate, breezy history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be,” our reviewer writes. “Perfect for Seinfeldians and newcomers alike.” View video >