Graphic Novels & Comic Books Book Reviews (page 3)

A CONNECTICUT YANKEE IN KING ARTHUR'S COURT by Mark Twain
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Feb. 18, 2014

"Chwast and Twain are a match made in heaven."
Design veteran Chwast delivers another streamlined, graphic adaptation of classic literature, this time Mark Twain's caustic, inventive satire of feudal England. Read full book review >
GULLIVER'S TRAVELS by Martin Rowson
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Nov. 1, 2013

"A filthy, fantastic and fitting continuation of a misanthropic classic."
Cartoonist and novelist Rowson revisits Jonathan Swift's classic caustic exploration of human nature in this visceral, contemporary graphic-novel sequel. Read full book review >

THE BEST AMERICAN COMICS 2013 by Jeff Smith
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 8, 2013

"At its best, a gorgeous, glorious inferno of imagination; at its worst, great art."
The eighth volume of the series collects 30 examples of graphic storytelling—either in whole or as excerpts—from graphic novels, pamphlet comics, newspapers, magazines, minicomics and Web comics. Read full book review >
CURSE OF THE GRIFFIN by Jerome Walford
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: July 13, 2013

"A dystopian vampire fantasy likely to appeal more to fans of The Hunger Games than the Twilight saga."
In this action-packed series opener, a starving artist finds that there's magic in his past, and he's determined to better his life as a commoner in a world ruled by vampires. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Oct. 9, 2012

"Brilliantly juxtaposes Marvel with its best characters: flawed and imperfect, but capable of achieving miraculous feats."
An impeccably researched, authoritative history of Marvel Comics. Read full book review >

BUILDING STORIES by Chris Ware
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Oct. 2, 2012

"A dazzling document, beautifully if most idiosyncratically drawn; in this iteration, sure to become a collector's item, though one that begs for an easier-to-handle trade edition."
A treasure trove of graphic artworks—they're too complex to be called comics—from Ware, master of angst, alienation, sci-fi and the crowded street. Read full book review >
THE GRAPHIC CANON by Russ Kick
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: May 22, 2012

"If artists, as British sculptor Anish Kapoor famously said, make mythologies, then this volume is genuinely a marriage of equals."
Classic literature gets desterilized with the help of the modern world's most daring graphic artists. Read full book review >
JOE GOLEM AND THE DROWNING CITY by Christopher Golden
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: April 3, 2012

"Mignola's affectionate, Kirby-esque portraits compliment Golden's imaginative, YA-friendly prose."
An adolescent orphan navigates a subterranean world of magic and technology with the help of an aged detective and his mysterious square-jawed protector. Read full book review >
TINA'S MOUTH by Keshni Kashyap
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Jan. 3, 2012

"A charming, hip, illustrated coming-of-age tale."
Indian-American high-school student with a thing for Jean Paul Sartre struggles with existential angst in this graphic-novel debut. Read full book review >
THE BEST AMERICAN COMICS 2011 by Alison Bechdel
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Oct. 4, 2011

"The state of an art that has yet to reach stasis."
Another annual cornucopia of graphic narrative (and comic strips). Read full book review >
DEAR CREATURE by Jonathan Case
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2011

"A funny, bizarre, unexpected pleasure that gives a creature from the depths heart and soul as well as a happy ending."
A mutant submariner pines for a surface girl trapped in a prison of her own making. Read full book review >
HABIBI by Craig Thompson
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Sept. 1, 2011

"A mature—in all its meanings—glimpse into a world few Westerners are at home with, and Thompson is respectful throughout."
Thompson (Good-Bye, Chunky Rice, 2006, etc.) returns after a five-year absence with a graphic novel that is sure to attract attention—and perhaps even controversy. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >