Graphic Novels & Comic Books Book Reviews (page 5)

ANTHEM by Ayn Rand
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Feb. 1, 2011

"A Rand primer with pictures."
A graphic novel for devotees of Ayn Rand. Read full book review >
RAT CATCHER by Andy Diggle
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Jan. 19, 2011

"Diggle's (The Losers: Book Two, 2010, etc.) taut, fast-moving narrative and Ibañez's in-your-face, Will Eisner-like artwork combine in a remarkably entertaining tale."
A rat catcher catches rats (informers) for the mob, but in this dark graphic novel it's an art to separate the rats from the cats. Read full book review >

THE BEST AMERICAN COMICS 2010 by Neil Gaiman
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Oct. 15, 2010

"Every year seems to raise the bar."
Another star-studded anthology grapples with the challenge of whether comics can survive respectability. Read full book review >
X'ED OUT by Charles Burns
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Oct. 1, 2010

"The narrative builds to a revelatory climax that falls far short of a conclusion, implying the unstated, 'To be continued…'"
This graphic novel is more like an apocalyptic hallucination. Read full book review >
DANTE’S DIVINE COMEDY by Seymour Chwast
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Sept. 1, 2010

"An achievement kindred to R. Crumb's Genesis (2009), though less literal and more compressed."
In his first graphic novel, one classic artist channels another. Read full book review >

THE BEAUFORT DIARIES by T Cooper
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: July 6, 2010

"Outlandish and frequently hilarious."
An unlikely premise—a polar bear makes it big in Los Angeles and then crashes—but somehow Cooper (Lipshitz Six, or Two Angry Blondes, 2006, etc.) makes it work. Read full book review >
GO, MUTANTS! by Larry Doyle
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: July 1, 2010

"Rollickingly inventive and often hilarious—but it seems at times like a skit that, perhaps in the wake of an atomic accident, has mutated into (dear God!) an epic."
In a melting-pot society populated by the aliens and humans of 1950s space-invader movies, a brooding blue rebel with a giant brain grapples with prejudice and hormones in that most horrific of earthly battlegrounds—high school. Read full book review >
BODY WORLD by Dash Shaw
Kirkus Star
by Dash Shaw, illustrated by Dash Shaw
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: April 13, 2010

"Not for kids or repressively mature adults, but a real kick for those in between."
A graphic novel that seems not only to expand the possibilities of the form but explode them. Read full book review >
GOATS by Jonathan Rosenberg
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Dec. 1, 2009

"Funny, though it's worth pointing out that, at last check, this material was still available for viewing on the website—which raises the question of why this compilation exists at all."
Second compilation of Rosenberg's popular, long-running Web comic. Read full book review >
THE BEST AMERICAN COMICS 2009 by Charles Burns
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Oct. 8, 2009

"One of the more recent additions to the Best American Series has established itself as one of the most valuable."
Annual anthology finds the state of graphic narrative in robust health. Read full book review >
LOGICOMIX by Apostolos Doxiadis
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Oct. 1, 2009

"Despite the collaborators' best efforts to emphasize the human element, this graphic novel can't help but read a lot like a textbook."
Bertrand Russell—philosophical superhero? Read full book review >
RICHARD STARK’S PARKER THE HUNTER by Darwyn Cooke
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: July 22, 2009

"Fans of the noirest noir, such as Frank Miller's Sin City series, will find a lot to like in this well-executed adaptation."
Graphic-novel version of dark 1950s crime fiction. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >