Graphic Novels & Comic Books Book Reviews (page 6)

THE NOBODY by Jeff Lemire
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: July 1, 2009

"Black-and-white artistry perfectly complements the noirish plot."
Taut, elliptical graphic novel serves as both existential parable and homage to an earlier era of classic comics. Read full book review >
ASTERIOS POLYP by David  Mazzucchelli
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: June 2, 2009

"A visual and even philosophical stunner."
Even by the standards of the graphic novel, this cosmic epic pushes the creative envelope. Read full book review >

THE BETTER MOUSETRAP by Tom Holt
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: May 1, 2009

"Funny and intriguingly complex—a difficult juggling act that Holt carries off with aplomb."
More humor with a British accent—from the prolific Holt, a sequel to The Portable Door (2004) and fourth in a series set in the same science-fantasy universe. Read full book review >
ENEMIES & ALLIES by Kevin J. Anderson
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: May 1, 2009

"<\b>Injects a welcome dose of retro exuberance into the capes-and-tights routine."
Caped Crusader meets Man of Steel in the early 1950s. Read full book review >
BRITTEN AND BRÜLIGHTLY by Hannah Berry
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: April 1, 2009

"This isn't just inspired comics artistry, its inspired artistry."
The graphic novel is treated as film noir in this deftly written, visually stunning debut. Read full book review >

IN THE FLESH by Koren Shadmi
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Feb. 3, 2009

"Not for the squeamish or literal-minded, but in a genre whose artists routinely test all sorts of boundaries, this debut collection obliterates them."
A debut collection of ten short graphic narratives from Israel native Shadmi. Read full book review >
BREAKDOWNS by Art Spiegelman
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Oct. 7, 2008

"Fans of graphic novels in general and Spiegelman in particular will savor this."
A reissue of the graphic artist's early, little-seen volume shows his formative work, while an extensive forword and afterword provide autobiographical context. Read full book review >
AN ANTHOLOGY OF GRAPHIC FICTION, CARTOONS, AND TRUE STORIES by Ivan Brunetti
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Oct. 1, 2008

"The anthology suggests that, thankfully, this extended family isn't close to exhausting its creative potential."
Don't be fooled by the prosaic title or the whiff of pedagogy in the introduction; this is the world of comics—or at least the North American, English-speaking part of that world—at its liveliest. Read full book review >
THE LOST COLONY: BOOK 3 by Grady Klein
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Oct. 1, 2008

"Visually engaging, but otherwise an utter mess."
An absurdly whimsical graphic novel devised with more style than substance. Read full book review >
THE ALCOHOLIC by Jonathan Ames
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Sept. 17, 2008

"Could be the most compelling and provocative work from either collaborator."
Rarely does a collaboration produce a graphic novel of such literary and artistic merit. Read full book review >
GENTLEMAN JIM by Raymond Briggs
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: July 1, 2008

"A short, sweet and meaningful volume."
This slim volume, a reissue of a 1980 work, has seminal significance in the development of the graphic novel. Read full book review >
THE RABBI’S CAT 2 by Joann Sfar
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 2008

"Ranks up there with the most provocative graphic narratives for adults."
The sequel to Sfar's graphic novel about a talking cat. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >