Graphic Novels & Comic Books Book Reviews (page 7)

JOE GOLEM AND THE DROWNING CITY by Christopher Golden
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: April 3, 2012

"Mignola's affectionate, Kirby-esque portraits compliment Golden's imaginative, YA-friendly prose."
An adolescent orphan navigates a subterranean world of magic and technology with the help of an aged detective and his mysterious square-jawed protector. Read full book review >
TINA'S MOUTH by Keshni Kashyap
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Jan. 3, 2012

"A charming, hip, illustrated coming-of-age tale."
Indian-American high-school student with a thing for Jean Paul Sartre struggles with existential angst in this graphic-novel debut. Read full book review >

THE BEST AMERICAN COMICS 2011 by Alison Bechdel
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Oct. 4, 2011

"The state of an art that has yet to reach stasis."
Another annual cornucopia of graphic narrative (and comic strips). Read full book review >
DEAR CREATURE by Jonathan Case
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2011

"A funny, bizarre, unexpected pleasure that gives a creature from the depths heart and soul as well as a happy ending."
A mutant submariner pines for a surface girl trapped in a prison of her own making. Read full book review >
HABIBI by Craig Thompson
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Sept. 1, 2011

"A mature—in all its meanings—glimpse into a world few Westerners are at home with, and Thompson is respectful throughout."
Thompson (Good-Bye, Chunky Rice, 2006, etc.) returns after a five-year absence with a graphic novel that is sure to attract attention—and perhaps even controversy. Read full book review >

LIFE WITH MR. DANGEROUS by Paul Hornschemeier
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: May 24, 2011

"The artist displays an affinity for dialogue balloons that float beyond the panel, while plenty of other powerful passages are simply wordless."
Empathy and creativity inform this unsentimentalized account of a young woman's loneliness. Read full book review >
MISTER WONDERFUL by Daniel Clowes
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: April 12, 2011

"Clowes finds heightened reality in caricature."
An expansion of the strip initially serialized in the New York Times Magazine.Read full book review >
THE CARDBOARD VALISE by Ben Katchor
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Feb. 15, 2011

"A parallel dimension that readers might find creatively charged or thematically exhausting."
The book-length publication of the acclaimed visual artist's weekly strips defies narrative convention as a graphic novel. Read full book review >
ANTHEM by Ayn Rand
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Feb. 1, 2011

"A Rand primer with pictures."
A graphic novel for devotees of Ayn Rand. Read full book review >
RAT CATCHER by Andy Diggle
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Jan. 19, 2011

"Diggle's (The Losers: Book Two, 2010, etc.) taut, fast-moving narrative and Ibañez's in-your-face, Will Eisner-like artwork combine in a remarkably entertaining tale."
A rat catcher catches rats (informers) for the mob, but in this dark graphic novel it's an art to separate the rats from the cats. Read full book review >
THE BEST AMERICAN COMICS 2010 by Neil Gaiman
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Oct. 15, 2010

"Every year seems to raise the bar."
Another star-studded anthology grapples with the challenge of whether comics can survive respectability. Read full book review >
X'ED OUT by Charles Burns
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Oct. 1, 2010

"The narrative builds to a revelatory climax that falls far short of a conclusion, implying the unstated, 'To be continued…'"
This graphic novel is more like an apocalyptic hallucination. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >