Graphic Novels & Comic Books Book Reviews (page 8)

TURPENTINE by Spring Warren
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

"The journey eventually becomes tedious as Ned fails to establish an identity that satisfies both himself and the reader."
An effete easterner in western guise rambles across the 19th-century American landscape. Read full book review >
TURPENTINE by Spring Warren
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

"The journey eventually becomes tedious as Ned fails to establish an identity that satisfies both himself and the reader."
An effete easterner in western guise rambles across the 19th-century American landscape. Read full book review >

THE BLACK DIAMOND DETECTIVE AGENCY by Eddie Campbell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2007

"The veteran artist rises to a new challenge."
A visually stunning graphic narrative with all sorts of complicated plot twists. Read full book review >
SPENT by Joe Matt
by Joe Matt, illustrated by Joe Matt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2007

"Not for kids, though adult readers should take some pleasure knowing that they're better off than Matt, at least as depicted here."
The cartoonist tests the limits of pathetic self-absorption in a volume that should appeal to his cult following but is unlikely to expand it. Read full book review >
AYA by Marguerite Abouet
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 20, 2007

"A smart and sweetly comic glimpse of a time and place in Africa that get little attention in the West."
A young woman navigates shallow men, self-destructive friends and the newly erected class ladder in the prosperous city of Abidjan. Read full book review >

THE BEST AMERICAN COMICS 2006 by Harvey Pekar
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 11, 2006

"A worthy launch for what appears destined to become a valuable annual anthology."
The latest addition to the publisher's venerable "Best American" series not only provides an expansive survey of the contemporary graphic landscape, but serves as an effective introduction to an art long consigned to the cultural underground. Read full book review >
CHICKEN WITH PLUMS by Marjane Satrapi
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 3, 2006

"A thin sliver of illustrated memoir that barely hits its stride before fading away."
Satrapi (Embroideries, 2005, etc.) recalls the tragic final days of her great-uncle, an Iranian musician who died of a broken heart after his wife destroyed his favorite instrument. Read full book review >
WILL EISNER’S NEW YORK by Will Eisner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2006

"Incredible sights and bite-sized sagas of the city that never sleeps."
From skyscraper to subway, fat cats to the homeless, here's the Big Apple envisioned by one of America's top graphic-novelists—a town without pity but teeming with terrific tales. Read full book review >
JOKES AND THE UNCONSCIOUS by Daphne Gottlieb
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2006

"Spirited and often funny, but maddeningly discursive."
Gottlieb, a performance poet, and DiMassa, creator of the comic series Hothead Paisan: Homicidal Lesbian Terrorist, join forces for this graphic novel about a young woman wrestling with both her father's death and her sexual identity. Read full book review >
AN ANTHOLOGY OF GRAPHIC FICTION, CARTOONS, AND TRUE STORIES by Ivan Brunetti
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2006

"Broad in scope if somewhat narrow in emotional pitch, this stands to be, along with Houghton Mifflin's The Best American Comics 2006 (also October), a definitive text on American comic art for a good while."
An ambitious compendium of graphic narratives, designed to showcase both the varied styles and emotional depth of the field. Read full book review >
SHENZHEN by Guy Delisle
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 5, 2006

"While never preaching, this volume makes a forceful case for creative license and personal liberty, as the artist discovers that there's no place like home."
A sharp eye for detail, self-deprecating humor and subtle, shadowy drawings highlight this engaging, ambitious graphic narrative. Read full book review >
ABANDON THE OLD IN TOKYO by Yoshihiro Tatsumi
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2006

"Fans of the contemporary graphic narrative won't find this volume of Tatsumi's work dated in the slightest."
The artist's second volume of stories to be published in the US, originally published in Japan in 1970, shows that the graphic visionary was decades ahead of his time. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >