Graphic Novels & Comic Books Book Reviews (page 8)

GET A LIFE by Philippe Dupuy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2006

"A genial and funny snapshot of the Left Bank lifestyle."
Oh, to be young, successful and neurotic. Read full book review >
CASTLE WAITING by Linda Medley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 24, 2006

"A sweetly appealing tale that's ambitious beyond its means."
Looping fairytale that begins and ends in the same sprawling castle. Read full book review >

GOOD-BYE, CHUNKY RICE by Craig Thompson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 9, 2006

"For characters who must pursue their own destinies, love is as boundless as the sea."
Though the title and the deceptively simple character drawings suggest a kids' comic, rarely are graphic novels aimed at adults as sweetly affecting as this. Read full book review >
MY MOST SECRET DESIRE by Julie Doucet
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 15, 2006

"Doucet's dreamscape is an intriguing place to visit, though it might be a little scary to live there."
A dirty mind proves creatively liberating and socially subversive, as this Montreal native finds catharsis for her deepest fears, desires and neuroses through these drawings of her dreams. Read full book review >
EGO AND HUBRIS by Harvey Pekar
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 28, 2006

"Whether or not Pekar has exhausted the storytelling possibilities of his own life, fans will appreciate this change of pace."
The latest from the renowned graphic memoirist offers a fascinating character study of a character who isn't Harvey Pekar. Read full book review >

LA PERDIDA by Jessica Abel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 7, 2006

"An emotional, beautifully crafted odyssey that not only utilizes but transcends both navel-gazing self-discovery and backpackers-in-peril clichés."
Nice Chicago girl goes to Mexico City and ends up with far more than she can handle. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2006

"If this collection spawns annual volumes, they'll need to be more representative and timely—or carry a different title."
This grab-bag, scattershot selection might appeal to fans of contemporary comics but won't win converts or satisfy the curious. Read full book review >
NIGHT FISHER by R. Kikuo Johnson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2005

"A dark, grand, sweeping dream of a book."
The lulling beauty of Hawaii proves a troubling soporific for a quiet and once-promising teenager. Read full book review >
IT’S SUPERMAN! by Tom De Haven
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Nov. 1, 2005

"Comic noir with a super-keen edge, in De Haven's best book yet."
The formative years of the Man of Steel, in a rib-tickling melodrama set in Depression-era America. Read full book review >
BLACK HOLE by Charles Burns
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 18, 2005

"This volume should expand the cult following of a cutting-edge illustrator."
There's nothing funny about high school in this black-and-white comics collection, which should strike a particularly sharp chord among those who endured and survived their adolescent rites of passage in the early 1970s. Read full book review >
WIMBLEDON GREEN by Seth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 15, 2005

"A humble hobby is pursued with Indiana Jones-style vigor."
How did the world's greatest comic collector get to be so great? And what's with the hats? Read full book review >
THE QUITTER by Harvey Pekar
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 5, 2005

"A lean and angry work, anchored by a mellowing sense of self-discovery."
Pekar digs deep into his childhood to find the roots of his desperate fear of failure. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Pierce Brown
author of GOLDEN SON
February 17, 2015

With shades of The Hunger Games, Ender’s Game, and Game of Thrones, Pierce Brown’s genre-defying Red Rising hit the ground running. The sequel, Golden Son, continues the saga of Darrow, a rebel battling to lead his oppressed people to freedom. As a Red, Darrow grew up working the mines deep beneath the surface of Mars, enduring backbreaking labor while dreaming of the better future he was building for his descendants. But the Society he faithfully served was built on lies. Darrow’s kind have been betrayed and denied by their elitist masters, the Golds—and their only path to liberation is revolution. “Stirring—and archetypal—stuff,” our reviewer writes. View video >