Graphic Novels & Comic Books Book Reviews (page 8)

DANTE’S DIVINE COMEDY by Seymour Chwast
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Sept. 1, 2010

"An achievement kindred to R. Crumb's Genesis (2009), though less literal and more compressed."
In his first graphic novel, one classic artist channels another. Read full book review >
THE BEAUFORT DIARIES by T Cooper
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: July 6, 2010

"Outlandish and frequently hilarious."
An unlikely premise—a polar bear makes it big in Los Angeles and then crashes—but somehow Cooper (Lipshitz Six, or Two Angry Blondes, 2006, etc.) makes it work. Read full book review >

GO, MUTANTS! by Larry Doyle
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: July 1, 2010

"Rollickingly inventive and often hilarious—but it seems at times like a skit that, perhaps in the wake of an atomic accident, has mutated into (dear God!) an epic."
In a melting-pot society populated by the aliens and humans of 1950s space-invader movies, a brooding blue rebel with a giant brain grapples with prejudice and hormones in that most horrific of earthly battlegrounds—high school. Read full book review >
BODY WORLD by Dash Shaw
Kirkus Star
by Dash Shaw, illustrated by Dash Shaw
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: April 13, 2010

"Not for kids or repressively mature adults, but a real kick for those in between."
A graphic novel that seems not only to expand the possibilities of the form but explode them. Read full book review >
GOATS by Jonathan Rosenberg
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Dec. 1, 2009

"Funny, though it's worth pointing out that, at last check, this material was still available for viewing on the website—which raises the question of why this compilation exists at all."
Second compilation of Rosenberg's popular, long-running Web comic. Read full book review >

THE BEST AMERICAN COMICS 2009 by Charles Burns
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Oct. 8, 2009

"One of the more recent additions to the Best American Series has established itself as one of the most valuable."
Annual anthology finds the state of graphic narrative in robust health. Read full book review >
LOGICOMIX by Apostolos Doxiadis
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Oct. 1, 2009

"Despite the collaborators' best efforts to emphasize the human element, this graphic novel can't help but read a lot like a textbook."
Bertrand Russell—philosophical superhero? Read full book review >
RICHARD STARK’S PARKER THE HUNTER by Darwyn Cooke
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: July 22, 2009

"Fans of the noirest noir, such as Frank Miller's Sin City series, will find a lot to like in this well-executed adaptation."
Graphic-novel version of dark 1950s crime fiction. Read full book review >
THE NOBODY by Jeff Lemire
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: July 1, 2009

"Black-and-white artistry perfectly complements the noirish plot."
Taut, elliptical graphic novel serves as both existential parable and homage to an earlier era of classic comics. Read full book review >
ASTERIOS POLYP by David  Mazzucchelli
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: June 2, 2009

"A visual and even philosophical stunner."
Even by the standards of the graphic novel, this cosmic epic pushes the creative envelope. Read full book review >
THE BETTER MOUSETRAP by Tom Holt
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: May 1, 2009

"Funny and intriguingly complex—a difficult juggling act that Holt carries off with aplomb."
More humor with a British accent—from the prolific Holt, a sequel to The Portable Door (2004) and fourth in a series set in the same science-fantasy universe. Read full book review >
ENEMIES & ALLIES by Kevin J. Anderson
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: May 1, 2009

"<\b>Injects a welcome dose of retro exuberance into the capes-and-tights routine."
Caped Crusader meets Man of Steel in the early 1950s. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >