Graphic Novels & Comic Books Book Reviews (page 8)

DEAR CREATURE by Jonathan Case
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2011

"A funny, bizarre, unexpected pleasure that gives a creature from the depths heart and soul as well as a happy ending."
A mutant submariner pines for a surface girl trapped in a prison of her own making. Read full book review >
HABIBI by Craig Thompson
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Sept. 1, 2011

"A mature—in all its meanings—glimpse into a world few Westerners are at home with, and Thompson is respectful throughout."
Thompson (Good-Bye, Chunky Rice, 2006, etc.) returns after a five-year absence with a graphic novel that is sure to attract attention—and perhaps even controversy. Read full book review >

LIFE WITH MR. DANGEROUS by Paul Hornschemeier
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: May 24, 2011

"The artist displays an affinity for dialogue balloons that float beyond the panel, while plenty of other powerful passages are simply wordless."
Empathy and creativity inform this unsentimentalized account of a young woman's loneliness. Read full book review >
MISTER WONDERFUL by Daniel Clowes
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: April 12, 2011

"Clowes finds heightened reality in caricature."
An expansion of the strip initially serialized in the New York Times Magazine.Read full book review >
THE CARDBOARD VALISE by Ben Katchor
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Feb. 15, 2011

"A parallel dimension that readers might find creatively charged or thematically exhausting."
The book-length publication of the acclaimed visual artist's weekly strips defies narrative convention as a graphic novel. Read full book review >

ANTHEM by Ayn Rand
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Feb. 1, 2011

"A Rand primer with pictures."
A graphic novel for devotees of Ayn Rand. Read full book review >
RAT CATCHER by Andy Diggle
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Jan. 19, 2011

"Diggle's (The Losers: Book Two, 2010, etc.) taut, fast-moving narrative and Ibañez's in-your-face, Will Eisner-like artwork combine in a remarkably entertaining tale."
A rat catcher catches rats (informers) for the mob, but in this dark graphic novel it's an art to separate the rats from the cats. Read full book review >
THE BEST AMERICAN COMICS 2010 by Neil Gaiman
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Oct. 15, 2010

"Every year seems to raise the bar."
Another star-studded anthology grapples with the challenge of whether comics can survive respectability. Read full book review >
X'ED OUT by Charles Burns
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Oct. 1, 2010

"The narrative builds to a revelatory climax that falls far short of a conclusion, implying the unstated, 'To be continued…'"
This graphic novel is more like an apocalyptic hallucination. Read full book review >
DANTE’S DIVINE COMEDY by Seymour Chwast
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Sept. 1, 2010

"An achievement kindred to R. Crumb's Genesis (2009), though less literal and more compressed."
In his first graphic novel, one classic artist channels another. Read full book review >
THE BEAUFORT DIARIES by T Cooper
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: July 6, 2010

"Outlandish and frequently hilarious."
An unlikely premise—a polar bear makes it big in Los Angeles and then crashes—but somehow Cooper (Lipshitz Six, or Two Angry Blondes, 2006, etc.) makes it work. Read full book review >
GO, MUTANTS! by Larry Doyle
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: July 1, 2010

"Rollickingly inventive and often hilarious—but it seems at times like a skit that, perhaps in the wake of an atomic accident, has mutated into (dear God!) an epic."
In a melting-pot society populated by the aliens and humans of 1950s space-invader movies, a brooding blue rebel with a giant brain grapples with prejudice and hormones in that most horrific of earthly battlegrounds—high school. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 6, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >