Graphic Novels & Comic Books Book Reviews (page 9)

GO, MUTANTS! by Larry Doyle
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: July 1, 2010

"Rollickingly inventive and often hilarious—but it seems at times like a skit that, perhaps in the wake of an atomic accident, has mutated into (dear God!) an epic."
In a melting-pot society populated by the aliens and humans of 1950s space-invader movies, a brooding blue rebel with a giant brain grapples with prejudice and hormones in that most horrific of earthly battlegrounds—high school. Read full book review >
BODY WORLD by Dash Shaw
Kirkus Star
by Dash Shaw, illustrated by Dash Shaw
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: April 13, 2010

"Not for kids or repressively mature adults, but a real kick for those in between."
A graphic novel that seems not only to expand the possibilities of the form but explode them. Read full book review >

GOATS by Jonathan Rosenberg
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Dec. 1, 2009

"Funny, though it's worth pointing out that, at last check, this material was still available for viewing on the website—which raises the question of why this compilation exists at all."
Second compilation of Rosenberg's popular, long-running Web comic. Read full book review >
THE BEST AMERICAN COMICS 2009 by Charles Burns
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Oct. 8, 2009

"One of the more recent additions to the Best American Series has established itself as one of the most valuable."
Annual anthology finds the state of graphic narrative in robust health. Read full book review >
LOGICOMIX by Apostolos Doxiadis
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Oct. 1, 2009

"Despite the collaborators' best efforts to emphasize the human element, this graphic novel can't help but read a lot like a textbook."
Bertrand Russell—philosophical superhero? Read full book review >

RICHARD STARK’S PARKER THE HUNTER by Darwyn Cooke
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: July 22, 2009

"Fans of the noirest noir, such as Frank Miller's Sin City series, will find a lot to like in this well-executed adaptation."
Graphic-novel version of dark 1950s crime fiction. Read full book review >
THE NOBODY by Jeff Lemire
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: July 1, 2009

"Black-and-white artistry perfectly complements the noirish plot."
Taut, elliptical graphic novel serves as both existential parable and homage to an earlier era of classic comics. Read full book review >
ASTERIOS POLYP by David  Mazzucchelli
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: June 2, 2009

"A visual and even philosophical stunner."
Even by the standards of the graphic novel, this cosmic epic pushes the creative envelope. Read full book review >
THE BETTER MOUSETRAP by Tom Holt
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: May 1, 2009

"Funny and intriguingly complex—a difficult juggling act that Holt carries off with aplomb."
More humor with a British accent—from the prolific Holt, a sequel to The Portable Door (2004) and fourth in a series set in the same science-fantasy universe. Read full book review >
ENEMIES & ALLIES by Kevin J. Anderson
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: May 1, 2009

"<\b>Injects a welcome dose of retro exuberance into the capes-and-tights routine."
Caped Crusader meets Man of Steel in the early 1950s. Read full book review >
BRITTEN AND BRÜLIGHTLY by Hannah Berry
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: April 1, 2009

"This isn't just inspired comics artistry, its inspired artistry."
The graphic novel is treated as film noir in this deftly written, visually stunning debut. Read full book review >
IN THE FLESH by Koren Shadmi
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Feb. 3, 2009

"Not for the squeamish or literal-minded, but in a genre whose artists routinely test all sorts of boundaries, this debut collection obliterates them."
A debut collection of ten short graphic narratives from Israel native Shadmi. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Emma Straub
author of MODERN LOVERS
May 30, 2016

In Emma Straub’s new novel Modern Lovers, friends and former college bandmates Elizabeth and Andrew and Zoe have watched one another marry, buy real estate, and start businesses and families, all while trying to hold on to the identities of their youth. But nothing ages them like having to suddenly pass the torch (of sexuality, independence, and the ineffable alchemy of cool) to their own offspring. Back in the band’s heyday, Elizabeth put on a snarl over her Midwestern smile, Andrew let his unwashed hair grow past his chin, and Zoe was the lesbian all the straight women wanted to sleep with. Now nearing fifty, they all live within shouting distance in the same neighborhood deep in gentrified Brooklyn, and the trappings of the adult world seem to have arrived with ease. But the summer that their children reach maturity (and start sleeping together), the fabric of the adult lives suddenly begins to unravel, and the secrets and revelations that are finally let loose—about themselves, and about the famous fourth band member who soared and fell without them—can never be reclaimed. “Straub’s characters are a quirky and interesting bunch, well aware of their own good fortune, and it’s a pleasure spending time with them in leafy Ditmas Park,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >