Graphic Novels & Comic Books Book Reviews (page 9)

WIMBLEDON GREEN by Seth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 15, 2005

"A humble hobby is pursued with Indiana Jones-style vigor."
How did the world's greatest comic collector get to be so great? And what's with the hats? Read full book review >
THE QUITTER by Harvey Pekar
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 5, 2005

"A lean and angry work, anchored by a mellowing sense of self-discovery."
Pekar digs deep into his childhood to find the roots of his desperate fear of failure. Read full book review >

PERFECT EXAMPLE by John Porcellino
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2005

"Small lives portrayed with a certain elegance, but nevertheless hampered by small vision."
Growing up ain't easy—at times it can get downright depressing. Read full book review >
NORTH COUNTRY by Shane White
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2005

"A dark, foreboding narrative whose style pays tribute to Robert McCloskey and 1950s Superman comics."
White combines memoir with a graphic-novel format in the story of a painful childhood. Read full book review >
THE ACME NOVELTY LIBRARY by Chris Ware
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2005

"Another winner from Ware, up there with Jimmy Corrigan."
Like the cartoon equivalent of Willy Wonka—a graphic visionary opens the door to his creative factory with a wide-ranging anthology that conjures a world (if not a universe) unto itself. Read full book review >

THE RABBI’S CAT by Joann Sfar
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 9, 2005

"An unexpectedly haunting work from a major talent."
An Algerian rabbi's cat gains the power of speech, giving it all the greater ability for mischief. Read full book review >
WALT & SKEEZIX by Frank King
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 15, 2005

"A handsomely mounted presentation for one of the 20th-century's landmark cartoons."
First volume of a worthy project to reintroduce the world to the gang at Gasoline Alley. Read full book review >
WAR’S END by Joe Sacco
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2005

"Worthy of a place on the shelf next to Safe Area Gorazde, The Fixer and Palestine. In just a few years, Sacco has created a body of work that includes some of the most important and relevant graphic novels of our time."
Two stories of unusual mirth from Europe's heart of darkness. Read full book review >
PAUL MOVES OUT by Michel Rabagliati
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2005

"A growing-into-adulthood story told with lovable buoyancy."
A Montreal art student finds love and a career in an unassuming graphic novel. Read full book review >
EMBROIDERIES by Marjane Satrapi
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 19, 2005

"Lighter in subject matter than her previous work, Satrapi keeps things semicomical, even when relating matters of severe heartbreak, and her dashed-off drawings (with their slightly childlike expressions) help matters along."
Let's talk about sex . . . and the disappointments of men. Read full book review >
GEMMA BOVERY by Posy Simmonds
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2005

"A moody and energetic variation on an old, old tale that seems brand-new."
A graphic novel updates a relationship that's doomed in the manner of Flaubert's tragic heroine's. Read full book review >
EPILEPTIC by David B.
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 4, 2005

"An unromantic, heartrending tale, wrapped in a cloak of nightmares."
Fantastical, gloriously illustrated graphic memoir of the French cartoonist's life, overshadowed by an epileptic brother. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fatima Bhutto
April 14, 2015

Set during the American invasion of Afghanistan, Fatima Bhutto’s debut novel The Shadow of the Crescent Moon begins and ends one rain-swept Friday morning in Mir Ali, a small town in Pakistan’s Tribal Areas close to the Afghan border. Three brothers meet for breakfast. Soon after, the eldest, Aman Erum, recently returned from America, hails a taxi to the local mosque. Sikandar, a doctor, drives to the hospital where he works, but must first stop to collect his troubled wife, who has not joined the family that morning. No one knows where Mina goes these days. But when, later in the morning, the two are taken hostage by members of the Taliban, Mina will prove to be stronger than anyone could have imagined. Our reviewer writes that The Shadow of the Crescent Moon is “a timely, earnest portrait of a family torn apart by the machinations of other people’s war games and desperately trying to survive.” View video >