Graphic Novels & Comic Books Book Reviews (page 9)

PERFECT EXAMPLE by John Porcellino
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2005

"Small lives portrayed with a certain elegance, but nevertheless hampered by small vision."
Growing up ain't easy—at times it can get downright depressing. Read full book review >
NORTH COUNTRY by Shane White
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2005

"A dark, foreboding narrative whose style pays tribute to Robert McCloskey and 1950s Superman comics."
White combines memoir with a graphic-novel format in the story of a painful childhood. Read full book review >

THE ACME NOVELTY LIBRARY by Chris Ware
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2005

"Another winner from Ware, up there with Jimmy Corrigan."
Like the cartoon equivalent of Willy Wonka—a graphic visionary opens the door to his creative factory with a wide-ranging anthology that conjures a world (if not a universe) unto itself. Read full book review >
THE RABBI’S CAT by Joann Sfar
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 9, 2005

"An unexpectedly haunting work from a major talent."
An Algerian rabbi's cat gains the power of speech, giving it all the greater ability for mischief. Read full book review >
WALT & SKEEZIX by Frank King
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 15, 2005

"A handsomely mounted presentation for one of the 20th-century's landmark cartoons."
First volume of a worthy project to reintroduce the world to the gang at Gasoline Alley. Read full book review >

WAR’S END by Joe Sacco
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2005

"Worthy of a place on the shelf next to Safe Area Gorazde, The Fixer and Palestine. In just a few years, Sacco has created a body of work that includes some of the most important and relevant graphic novels of our time."
Two stories of unusual mirth from Europe's heart of darkness. Read full book review >
PAUL MOVES OUT by Michel Rabagliati
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2005

"A growing-into-adulthood story told with lovable buoyancy."
A Montreal art student finds love and a career in an unassuming graphic novel. Read full book review >
EMBROIDERIES by Marjane Satrapi
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 19, 2005

"Lighter in subject matter than her previous work, Satrapi keeps things semicomical, even when relating matters of severe heartbreak, and her dashed-off drawings (with their slightly childlike expressions) help matters along."
Let's talk about sex . . . and the disappointments of men. Read full book review >
GEMMA BOVERY by Posy Simmonds
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2005

"A moody and energetic variation on an old, old tale that seems brand-new."
A graphic novel updates a relationship that's doomed in the manner of Flaubert's tragic heroine's. Read full book review >
EPILEPTIC by David B.
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 4, 2005

"An unromantic, heartrending tale, wrapped in a cloak of nightmares."
Fantastical, gloriously illustrated graphic memoir of the French cartoonist's life, overshadowed by an epileptic brother. Read full book review >
MOTHER COUNTRY by Peggy Leon
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Dec. 1, 2003

"Pleasantly quirky first novel: its appealing lack of gravitas makes it far easier to take seriously than your standard (angst-ridden) coming-of-ager."
Young orphan comes of age (with remarkable aplomb and lightheartedness) in 1950 Nevada. Read full book review >
REMEMBRANCE OF THINGS PAST by Stéphane Heuet
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2001

"Inviting enough to make readers seek out the novel—which means Heuet has done his job."
This comic-book version of Proust's masterpiece caused quite a stir when it first appeared in France, but the hoopla is undeserved. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Pierce Brown
author of GOLDEN SON
February 17, 2015

With shades of The Hunger Games, Ender’s Game, and Game of Thrones, Pierce Brown’s genre-defying Red Rising hit the ground running. The sequel, Golden Son, continues the saga of Darrow, a rebel battling to lead his oppressed people to freedom. As a Red, Darrow grew up working the mines deep beneath the surface of Mars, enduring backbreaking labor while dreaming of the better future he was building for his descendants. But the Society he faithfully served was built on lies. Darrow’s kind have been betrayed and denied by their elitist masters, the Golds—and their only path to liberation is revolution. “Stirring—and archetypal—stuff,” our reviewer writes. View video >