Graphic Novels & Comic Books Book Reviews (page 8)

GEMMA BOVERY by Posy Simmonds
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2005

"A moody and energetic variation on an old, old tale that seems brand-new."
A graphic novel updates a relationship that's doomed in the manner of Flaubert's tragic heroine's. Read full book review >
EPILEPTIC by David B.
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 4, 2005

"An unromantic, heartrending tale, wrapped in a cloak of nightmares. "
Fantastical, gloriously illustrated graphic memoir of the French cartoonist's life, overshadowed by an epileptic brother. Read full book review >

MOTHER COUNTRY by Peggy Leon
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Dec. 1, 2003

"Pleasantly quirky first novel: its appealing lack of gravitas makes it far easier to take seriously than your standard (angst-ridden) coming-of-ager."
Young orphan comes of age (with remarkable aplomb and lightheartedness) in 1950 Nevada. Read full book review >
REMEMBRANCE OF THINGS PAST by Stéphane Heuet
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2001

This comic-book version of Proust's masterpiece caused quite a stir when it first appeared in France, but the hoopla is undeserved. Read full book review >

SPEECHLESS by Peter Kuper
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2001

Collecting work from the entire career, beginning back in the mid-1980s, of illustrator, cartoonist, and narrative artist Kuper (Mind's Eye, 2000, etc.), this full-color anthology displays a range and richness of design that places him among the best graphic artists of his time: innovative, insightful, and always compelling. Read full book review >


THE MYSTERY OF MARY ROGERS by Rick Geary
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2001

The author/illustrator of Jack the Ripper (1995) continues to focus on Victorian crime in this latest historical comic, part of a series on 19th-century murder, based on a true-life story so compelling it inspired a short story by Edgar Allan Poe. Read full book review >

NO PASARÁN! by Vittorio Giardino
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2000

"Stylistically similar to Giardino's previous work, this compelling narrative artfully plays with a question: Who's spying for whom? And the cliff-hanging ending of this first half sustains our interest in the answer."
After the stunning achievement of his Jew in Communist Prague (1997-98), Giardino returns to familiar territory—his ongoing character, Max Friedman, a reluctant spy whose adventures intersect with 20th-century politics across a number of continents. Read full book review >
FRISCO PIGEON MAMBO by C.D. Payne
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Oct. 15, 2000

"As parodies of human excess, the pigeons simply chase after the same promises in life. Amusing? Barely. Some may lap it up but few will find it as riotous as the Nick Twisp saga."
Self-publisher Payne, whose Nick Twisp series is making a splash (see below), creates his own Animal Farm in a fable of escaped lab animals that can't give up booze, tobacco, and whatchugot. Read full book review >
HELL ON EARTH by Robert Bloch
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"Volume One of The Lost Bloch went quickly out of print, as almost certainly will Volume Two. Don't miss the fun."
Second of a promised three volumes (The Devil with You!, 1999) of Psycho Bob's earliest penny-a-word paste gems from his golden days in pulps (Weird Tales, Amazing Stories, Blue Book, and Imaginative Tales). Read full book review >
FISSION by Helga Königsdorf
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

A graceful 1986 meditation on ethnic identity, the mixed blessings of scientific discovery, and the nature of disability, written by a former East German novelist and teacher of mathematics and science. Read full book review >

JIMMY CORRIGAN by Chris Ware
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 5, 2000

"Everything here boggles: the artfully conceived foldout dust-jacket, the cryptically word-burdened endpapers, and, most of all, the story itself: a graphic narrative that deserves a place beside the best novels of the year. "
The comics world has amply rewarded Ware for his amazingly innovative work—he's won numerous prizes for his Acme Novelty Library, a combination of complex narratives about mice, a trove of visually arcane inventions (diagrammed with Rube Goldberg-like precision), and plenty of eye-straining text: a graphic self-effacement that echoes the creepy despair of Ware's main creation, Jimmy Corrigan. Read full book review >
TEA by Stacey D’Erasmo
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 14, 2000

"An intermittently moving debut that tries too hard to be literary. Nonetheless, D'Erasmo is a writer to watch."
An evocative yet somewhat contrived first novel about a young suburban woman dealing with her mother's suicide and her own lesbianism. Read full book review >