The conclusion of an expansive, all-inclusive educational program.

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BASIC ACCOUNTING

BASIC ACCOUNTING CONCEPTS, PRINCIPLES, AND PROCEDURES, VOLUME 2, 2ND EDITION

The second volume of an extensive instructional course in accounting.

Mostyn (Accounting/Mission Coll.; Accounting Ace 911, 2001, etc.) continues the updated course of study established in his previous book. This volume moves beyond the foundational topics covered in the first; its seven sections address such subjects as merchandising operations, analyzing key accounts, analyzing and planning cash flow, and long-term liabilities. As in the first volume, the author explains everything in clear, straightforward terms and graphics. The book’s relatively large page size (8.5 by 11 inches) lends itself to the accounting examples, which include numerous spreadsheets, tables, and charts. The overall layout of the book remains inviting, with clearly delineated sections, two different colors of text, frequent but appropriately used bold type, and sidebars. Volume 2 closely follows the structural arrangement of Volume 1, with sections divided into specific “Learning Goals,” such as “Prepare Closing Entries” and “Record, Report, and Control Merchandise Inventory.” Also mirroring the first book, the Learning Goal chapters include specific examples, useful advice, and self-assessment tools; there’s also another CD of additional resources. The primary difference between this book and Volume 1 is that this one tackles subject matter that’s far more advanced and thus requires more extensive explanation. For example, the book’s first section, “Adjusting the Accounts,” includes a five-part appendix that digs into the details of such topics as prepaid expenses, unearned revenue, depreciation, and accrued revenues and expenses and provides step-by-step instructions for dealing with each of them. Overall, Mostyn’s instructive text, extensive examples, and interspersed self-tests provide a solid basis for learning, and taken together, this volume and its companion should offer students total immersion in its subject.

The conclusion of an expansive, all-inclusive educational program.

Pub Date: Sept. 30, 2017

ISBN: 978-0991423118

Page Count: 950

Publisher: Worthy and James Publishing

Review Posted Online: Jan. 26, 2018

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

SEVERAL SHORT SENTENCES ABOUT WRITING

New York Times columnist and editorial board member delivers a slim book for aspiring writers, offering saws and sense, wisdom and waggery, biases and biting sarcasm.

Klinkenborg (Timothy; or, Notes of an Abject Reptile, 2006), who’s taught for decades, endeavors to keep things simple in his prose, and he urges other writers to do the same. (Note: He despises abuses of the word as, as he continually reminds readers.) In the early sections, the author ignores traditional paragraphing so that the text resembles a long free-verse poem. He urges readers to use short, clear sentences and to make sure each one is healthy before moving on; notes that it’s acceptable to start sentences with and and but; sees benefits in diagramming sentences; stresses that all writing is revision; periodically blasts the formulaic writing that many (most?) students learn in school; argues that knowing where you’re headed before you begin might be good for a vacation, but not for a piece of writing; and believes that writers must trust readers more, and trust themselves. Most of Klinkenborg’s advice is neither radical nor especially profound (“Turn to the poets. / Learn from them”), and the text suffers from a corrosive fallacy: that if his strategies work for him they will work for all. The final fifth of the text includes some passages from writers he admires (McPhee, Oates, Cheever) and some of his students’ awkward sentences, which he treats analytically but sometimes with a surprising sarcasm that veers near meanness. He includes examples of students’ dangling modifiers, malapropisms, errors of pronoun agreement, wordiness and other mistakes.

Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

Pub Date: Aug. 7, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-307-26634-7

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: May 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2012

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