THE STAINED GLASS JUNGLE by Gregory Wilson

THE STAINED GLASS JUNGLE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This is a pen name for an ordained Methodist minister in the South and his picture of the power politics within this faith and the career of Jack Winters Lee cannot but concern and shock members of the church. At an annual conference, Jack, in recovering from a 19 hour amnesia, combines his present activities with recall of the past in trying to fuse his professional and personal drives. Electing to unseat Dr. (""Beloved"") Worthington's rule, Jack rounds up fellow rebels and makes his play to correct certain abuses, and the path of his politicking is paralleled by his memories of childhood and family, his hatred of his parents, his life at a church-related college, and the beginnings of his ministry. His affair with Theima, widow of the son of a parishioner, and the tormenting things this passion demands, his engagement to Patricia, Beloved's daughter, his attempt to break with Thelma and Patricia's refusing to marry him because of his persecution of her father, finally brings back the blacked-out period -- when he had seen Thelma fall to her death. His confession to an old friend and the need to carry through the conference procedures enable him to accept the pulpit in his home town and return with humility and real awareness, ready at last to face his parents and live with himself. A long, thoughtful book and a disturbing one, this will no doubt be disputed within the denomination but the general public's attention may be caught by the more lurid aspects.

Publisher: Doubleday