THE GOLDEN AGE OF THE AMERICAN RACING CAR by Griffith Borgeson

THE GOLDEN AGE OF THE AMERICAN RACING CAR

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The co-author of Sports and Classic Cars ('55) has his way with the turf-churners from the early experimentations and European imitations through the break-through of the Twenties to the happy madness of today. The author's first chapter is titled, ""The Passion of the Machine,"" and with a nod to meddling psychiatrists who have noted some entertaining sexual symbolism in the choice of vehicle, Mr. Borgeson struggles breezily with the compulsion to death-defy. Seems there's the rush of wind, the glory of the pursuit and overtaking, the aesthetic beauty of the machine--well, well, it either grabs you or it doesn't. In any case, some sound researching into the evolution of American racing cars is presented here, with plenteous accounts of assembling, whanging away at and racing the machines. Of particular interest is the concentration on the period when American pros began to rise to the challenge of the European purebred car. The personalities of the sport are given affectionate attention, and there is a liberal dollop of technical information. However for those who don't really care if the spark plug is threaded into the central boss, this offers a lively introductory view of the winners. Bouncy fare for buffs and beginners.

Publisher: Norton