OLIVES ON THE APPLE TREE by Guido D'Agostini

OLIVES ON THE APPLE TREE

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

Fante has interpreted Italian-Americans from one angle; di Donato from another. Here is a third interpretation, in less high-comic, high-tragic, primitive manner, a sad picture of assimilation in reverse, and a sincerely portrayed two generation story, limited, perhaps, in appeal, but well done. The setting is somewhere in New York state. The older generation is holding fast the peasant values; the new generation is trying to forget their past, become Americanized, even if the cost is becoming cheapened and unprincipled in the attempt. This is the story of Emilio, a doctor who tries to break through into the professional and social coteries of the town; who thinks he has ""arrived"" when he is merely ""used"" -- who blunders and is dropped and forced into a marriage he does not want. A convincing story, of definite appeal to anyone concerned in racial problems in the United States.

Pub Date: Nov. 1st, 1940
Publisher: Doubleday, Doran